Steaua from Bucharest

Steaua from Bucharest

FCSB
Fcsb-logo.svg
General data
Nom. full Football Club FCSB
Nickname (s) Steliștii
Roş-Albaștrii
(Reds and blues)
Foundation June 7, 1947 (73 years)
(as Asociația Sportivă a Armatei București)
Owner (s) Flag of Romania.svg George Becali
President Flag of Romania.svg Valeriu Argăseala
Sports director Flag of Romania.svg Mihai stoica
Coach Flag of Romania.svg Anton Petrea
Manager Flag of Romania.svg Marius ianuli
Facilities
Stadium Arena Națională (currently)
Locate Us Bucharest, Romania
Capacity 55.635 viewers
Opening September 6, 2011 (9 years)
Uniform
Left arm kit fcsb1920h
Body kit fcsb1920h
Right arm kit fcsb1920h
Kit shorts.svg
Socks kit fcsb1920h
Sensitive Personal Data
Left arm kit fcsb2021a
Body kit fcsb2021a
Right arm kit fcsb2021a
Shorts kit fcsb2021a
Socks kit fcsb2021a
Alternativo
News
Soccerball current event.svg Season 2019-20
Official Web site

El Football Club FCSB(Formerly Fotbal Club Steaua Bucureşti), Known as Faci Ce Spune Becali (Do what Becali says), Steaua or only FCSB is a professional football club from the Ghencea neighborhood in Bucharest, Romania. It is the most successful club in Romania both nationally, with 26 first division titles, and internationally, being the first club in Eastern Europe to win the European Cup in 1986 after defeating FC Barcelona and the Super Cup in 1989. Europe after beating Dynamo Kiev in the same season. He was also runner-up in Europe in 2006 and a UEFA Cup semi-finalist in XNUMX.

The club was historically known as the sports club of the Romanian army. However, FC Steaua Bucharest formally separated from the sports society CSA Steaua Bucharest in 1998 and only maintains ties with the army due to the historical tradition that binds it to it, as well as the venue in which it operates, the Stadionul Ghencea , which although still belongs to the Romanian Ministry of National Defense, was given in concession to the football club for a period of 49 years.

Steaua have spent their entire history in the country's top flight (League I), finishing below sixth in just five seasons. Initially, the club played with the colors of the Romanian tricolor - blue, yellow and red - but yellow soon lost importance and the team became associated with the colors red and blue. His classic rivals are Rapid Bucharest and Dinamo Bucharest, the latter being with whom he plays the Romanian Football Classic.

Our Story

Gheorghe constantin vintage

Gheorghe Constantin, icon of the Steaua in the 1960s.

Marcel raducanu

Marcel Răducanu, idol of the 1970s

On June 7, 1947, at the initiative of various officers of the Romanian Royal Household, the first army sports club was founded by a decree signed by General Mihail Lascăr. In its beginnings, the club received the name of ASA Bucharest and had seven sports sections, including football that was directed by coach Coloman Braun-Bogdan. In 1948, by order 289 of the Ministry of National Defense, the ASA changed its name CSCA.

The following year, the club won its first title, the Romanian Cup, after defeating CSU Cluj in the final by 2-1. After changing its name to CCA in 1950, the club won its first league titles in the years 1951, 1952 and 1953, also obtaining the Cup in the 1951 and 1952 seasons. During this period the CCA received the nickname of Echipă de aur (in Spanish Gold teamIn 1956, in a match against Yugoslavia played in Belgrade, the Romanian soccer team was made up exclusively of CCA players, with the Romanian team winning by 1 to 0. That same year, the CCA, led by Ilie Savu, was the first Romanian club to embark on a tour of England, in which they achieved remarkable results against opponents such as Luton Town FC, Arsenal FC, Sheffield Wednesday FC and Wolverhampton Wanderers FC.

At the end of 1961, the CCA changed its name definitively to CSA Steaua, the Romanian word for star, in reference to the presence, like other teams linked to the armed forces in Eastern Europe, of a red star in its shield. During the following two decades the Steaua obtained irregular results, reaching only the league titles in the seasons 1967–68, 1975–76 and 1977–78. Notwithstanding the foregoing, he became champion of the Romanian Cup on 9 occasions, earning the nickname of Specialistă a Cupei (in Spanish Cup SpecialistsDuring this period, the club also inaugurated the Stadionul Ghencea with a friendly match against OFK Belgrade, on April 9, 1974. Until that date, Steaua had played at home in one of the two largest multisport stadiums in the country. Bucharest, Republicii and 23 August.

Soccer field.svg

Duckadam
Ivan (C)
Belodedici
Bumbescu
Barbulescu
Balint
balan
Boloni
Majearu
Lăcătuş
Piţurca
1986 European Cup final lineup.

Under the technical guidance of Emerich Jenei and Anghel Iordănescu (the latter as assistant), Steaua had an unexpected 1984-85 season by becoming league champions after six years. The following season, the club became the first Romanian team to reach the final of the European Cup, in which it beat Fútbol Club Barcelona, ​​after equalizing without goals for 120 minutes, by 2 to 0 from the penalty kicks, definition in which goalkeeper Helmuth Duckadam stood out when he managed to save the four shots executed by the Spanish team. In this way, Steaua became the first club in Eastern Europe to reach the highest continental title. Then he had to play the final of the Intercontinental Cup against River Plate, with whom he fell 0-1. Additionally, in 1987 Steaua won the 1986 European Super Cup after beating Dynamo Kiev 1-0, with a goal from Gheorghe Hagi.

During the rest of the 1980s, Steaua continued to perform well in the international arena, reaching the semi-finals of the European Cup in the 1987-88 season and the final in 1989, in which they lost to AC Milan by 4 points. to 0. While at the national level he won four other league championships (1985–86, 1986–87, 1987–88, 1988–89) and four national cups (1984–85, 1986–87, 1987–88, 1988 –89). Furthermore, from June 1986 to September 1989, the club remained undefeated for 104 consecutive games for the Romanian championship, thus setting a world record that was only surpassed in 1994 by ASEC Abidjan of Ivory Coast, although it still constitutes the longest undefeated by any European club.

With the economic opening brought about by the Romanian Revolution of 1989, several players who had shone at Steaua during the 1980s emigrated to other clubs in the West. However, the club recovered quickly and won six consecutive championships between the 1992-93 and 1997-98 seasons, thus matching what Chinezul Timişoara did in the 1920s, as well as three other Romanian Cups. in the 1995-96, 1996-97 and 1998-99 seasons. Internationally, they reached the group stage of the UEFA Champions League on three occasions between 1994-95 and 1996-97, being, to date, the only Romanian club to participate in this competition.

In 1998, the football club completely separated from CSA Steaua, changing its name to FC Steaua Bucharest and being managed by businessman Viorel Păunescu. However, the Păunescu administration fared poorly and the club soon found itself mired in debt. In order to remedy this, fellow businessman George Becali was offered the position of vice president, pending his investment in club. In 2002, Becali became a majority shareholder and transformed the club into a public company in January 2003. Due to its controversial character, most Steaua fans have been opposed to Becali.

On a sporting level, the club managed to qualify for the 2004-05 UEFA Cup group stage, becoming the first Romanian team to make the final draw of a European competition since 1993. The following season they managed to advance to the semi-finals of the UEFA Cup, where they lost to Middlesbrough FC thanks to a last-minute goal, in addition to qualifying for the UEFA Champions League after ten years. In the 2007-08 season, Steaua managed to qualify for the group stage of the Champions League. At the local level, it won two new league titles in 2004-05 and 2005-06, the Romanian Super Cup in 2006, and recently the Romanian Cup in 2010-11, the latter the 51st title in its history.

Historical controversies

Ienei Iordanescu Hagi Popescu cropped 2

Gica Hagi, another important club figure in the 80s.

Throughout the history of Steaua there have been various controversial situations regarding the club's past and its appropriation by the Romanian army before the 1989 Revolution, others such as the founding of the club, its activity in League I, the means of transferring players and the participation of the Ceauşescu family in the life of the team during the 1980s.

The club was founded as ASA Bucharest by the Royal Romanian Army on June 7, 1947. The debates on this question refer to the form of government of Romania, against the arguments that, on the one hand, the government was in its majority made up of communists and, on the other hand, that the country was still a constitutional monarchy, with the king acting as Supreme Commander of the Romanian Army. However, at the beginning of its first season, despite assisting in a play-off for promotion to Liga II, Carmen Bucharest was dissolved for political reasons and its place in Liga I was taken by ASA Bucharest. Subsequently, the team was never relegated and is currently one of the two teams that have always played in the first division together with Dinamo Bucharest.

The players signed for the club by organizing sports activities within the former communist countries. Beginning in 1947, the new communist government established rules indicating that each sports association was to be linked to a certain form of union or government institution, similar to Soviet sports societies. As professional football was abolished, therefore, players moved between teams as agreements between government club institutions, and not as regular market economy operations. Being the Army club, several talented young players would be tempted by Steaua to join its ranks, which has the advantages of improved conditions guaranteed by the club, the opportunity for a more productive career and also, among others, Gica Hagi was booked in this way from FC Sportul Studenţesc, also from Bucharest, for the 1987 European Super Cup match with SK Dinamo Kiev and then continued, at will, playing for Steaua, despite opposition from his former club. However, another famous example is also that of Gheorghe Popescu, signed in 1988 from FC Universitatea Craiova, apparently without the consent of the club or the player and who returned to his old club after a season.

Around the second half of the 1980s and also the last years of the communist regime in Romania, the adopted son of the dictator Nicolae Ceauşescu, Valentin, was heavily involved in the life of the team. Despite accusations of favoring the club at the national level by transferring the best players in the country and facilitating its fifth consecutive league championship title through arrangements with referees or rival teams, Valentin Ceauşescu stated in an interview that he had not done nothing but protecting his favorite team from the rival's sphere of influence, Dinamo Bucharest, a team owned by the Ministry of the Interior. Relatively little, however, is known about Valentin Ceauşescu's role in Steaua's history. Controversies over his unethical methods have yet to be proven, and consequently the issue remains under debate.

Shield

At the time of the founding of ASA Bucharest, on June 7, 1947, the club did not have an official emblem or insignia. When the communist government assumed full control of Romania on December 30, 1947, the Royal Army was transformed into the Romanian People's Army and the ASA was administered by the latter. Inspired by the Red Army, the new defense minister decided to create an emblem for the club, along with changing its name to CSCA, which consisted of a letter A inscribed in a red star (symbol of the Red Army) on a blue circular background. .

Stamps of Romania 2007-047

Commemorative stamp of the club on the occasion of the 60th anniversary. The shield that appears is that of the Steaua sports society and the one worn by the football team between 1991 and 1998.

Two years later, the change of name of the club to CCA brought with it a new emblem, which consisted of a red star, with the initials CCA engraved inside, surrounded by a laurel wreath. With the definitive change of name from the club to Steaua in 1961, the
The emblem was modified again, opting for a shield that consisted of a background with red and blue stripes with a golden star in the center, in order to symbolize the colors of the Romanian flag. This emblem was maintained until 1974, year in the one that was redesigned once the team moved to Stadionul Ghencea.
After the Romanian Revolution of 1989, in 1991 the army decided to break all the ties that linked it to the old communist regime, for this the CSA Steaua changed its emblem for the last time, including the image of an eagle, which is also present on the shield. of arms of the Ministry of Defense and in the national coat of arms of Romania. When FC Steaua formally parted ways with the sports society in 1998, the club added two yellow stars on the CSA Steaua crest in reference to the 20 league titles won, along with the Fotbal Club specification.

In 2003 the club's board, led by George Becali, decided to return to the emblem used between 1974 and 1991, although keeping the two yellow stars at the top.

The Romanian justice, through a complaint from the Ministry of Defense that opposed the club continuing to wear its characteristic signs, stripped Steaua of its shield, official name and uniform that it had worn since its foundation in 1947, in a published sentence in December 2014. The ministry claimed that it refused to allow the club's brand and values ​​"to be transferred in an abusive and illegal way to a private group", referring to its owner George Becali, who was imprisoned at the time. the club was able to recover its name and its traditional colors, but not the shield, which had to be redesigned with the acronym FCSB —Fotbal Club Steaua de Bucharest—. During several matches the club did not wear a shield and played in neutral yellow jerseys. Steaua played, so far, their last official match with the club's traditional shield on December 11, 2014 in a Europa League match against Dinamo de Kiev.

Uniform and colors

During its first season, 1947–48, the club's uniform sought to represent the colors of the Romanian flag, that is, a red and yellow vertical striped shirt and blue pants. At the beginning of the following season, and after the change of name from the Royal Navy to the Romanian People's Navy, yellow was gradually abandoned, until it reached the official colors that accompany the club to this day: red and blue. .
Although, throughout its history, the Steaua has never had a definitive uniform model, commonly this has consisted of a red shirt, blue pants and red socks. However, there have been several variations, including all-red, all-blue uniforms, and red and blue vertical striped shirts during the 1960s and 1970s. Other color combinations have been rarely used, these exceptions include the All-white uniform used, for the only time in its history, in the 1985-86 European Cup final, the yellow and red alternate uniform used in the 1999-00 season and the third yellow and black uniform used in the 2005 season– 06.

The starting kit for the 2008–09 season, like that used the previous season, consisted of a red and blue striped jersey and red shorts and socks, while the alternate kit was entirely blue.

Currently, the Steaua kit is manufactured by Nike, which was hired in 2002, after a long association with adidas. In 1988, Steaua was the first Romanian football team to sign a sponsorship to display advertising of a western company, Ford, the club secured other sponsors thereafter such as Castrol, Philips, CBS, Bancorex (initially BRCE), Dialog (now Orange), BCR and RAFO. In September 2007, the club signed a one-year contract with CitiFinancial valued at 1,3 million euros.

Stadium

Steaua played the first three games in its history at the now-defunct Venus Stadium. Inaugurated in 1931, the stadium was previously owned by ASC Venus Bucharest, a club dissolved in 1949. Following the demolition of Venus, by mandate of the communist regime , Steaua served as a venue in one of the two largest stadiums in Bucharest, Republicii (built in 1926) and August 23 (built in 1953). Of those two, the August 23 stadium (later renamed Lia Manoliu) was mostly used when two matches between Bucharest clubs were scheduled on the same day or for matches for European competitions, while the Republicii was used for regular matches within the local championship. .

Currently, Steaua operates as a venue at the Stadionul Ghencea, located in the southwest area of ​​Bucharest. Part of Complexul Sportiv Steaua, it was inaugurated on April 9, 1974, with a friendly match between Le Steaua and OFK Belgrade, and constituted the first stadium exclusively for football built in Communist Romania.

The stadium was built inside a former military base by order of the Ministry of National Defense and was used extensively by CSA Steaua. Today, despite pressure from the FC Steaua board of directors, the Ghencea is still owned by the Romanian Navy, but in 2006 it was given in concession to the football club for a period of 49 years.

The original capacity of the Ghencea was 30.000 spectators. However, in 1991 the stadium underwent various repairs, including the installation of seats, which reduced the capacity to 28.139 spectators, in addition to the installation of an artificial lighting system and the construction of a box.

After a second refurbishment in 2006, which included the renovation of the turf, Ghencea became one of the two stadiums in Romania, alongside Stadionul Dr. Constantin Rădulescu, qualified to host UEFA Champions League matches, being a stadium rated three stars according to the UEFA classification system Currently, there are plans to increase the stadium's capacity to 45.000 to 60.000 spectators.

Rivalries

steaua north

Steaua fans during the Marele Derby against Dinamo.

Steaua's traditional rival is Dinamo Bucharest, against whom the so-called Marele derby (in Spanish: The Great Derby). This rivalry has been the most important match in Romanian football in the last 60 years, as both Steaua and Dinamo are two of the most popular and winners in the country. Between them they have won 41 league titles (23 Steaua and 18). 23 Dinamo), winning 26 of the last XNUMX seasons. Traditionally the Marele derby It was seen as the confrontation between the Ministry of Defense and the Ministry of Internal Affairs, since they managed, respectively, Steaua and Dinamo.

Since the mid-1990s, violent clashes have often occurred between fans of both clubs both inside and outside the stadium. One of the most critical moments occurred in the moments before a match in 1997, when Dinamo fans set fire to the south sector, where they had been assigned, of the Stadionul Ghencea.

Although, in the historical balance of the derby, Steaua has an advantage, having won 61 of the 142 games played to date against 60 of Dinamo, the latter has reduced the difference, particularly thanks to the 18 official matches, both for the league and for the cup, in which they remained undefeated between April 1992 and April 2000. Similarly, Steaua remained between 1992 and 2007, undefeated for 15 years playing against Dinamo at home for league matches.

On the other hand, Steaua maintains a strong rivalry with Rapid Bucharest, in whose meetings, as against Dinamo, there have been serious incidents between the fans of both clubs. The rivalry gained even more force after Steaua eliminated Rapid in the 2005-06 UEFA Cup quarter-finals after an even XNUMX-goal tie on aggregate.

Steaua also have other milder or historic rivalries with other teams outside of Bucharest such as Universitatea Craiova, Politehnica Timișoara, Petrolul Ploiești and Universitatea Cluj.

Administration

Steaua has traditionally been known as the team of the Romanian Navy, who founded the club in 1947 as a sports society and to this day still manages CSA Steaua Bucharest.

The football section, however, depending on the rules imposed by UEFA, was separated from CSA Steaua and privatized in 1998, being managed by a non-profit organization called AFC Steaua Bucharest, chaired by businessman Viorel Păunescu. .

In January 2003, the club became a public company, under the leadership of George Becali, who initially acquired 51% of the club's share package, to later take over the rest and thus become the owner of the FC Steaua. At present Becali does not have any official link with the club, since little by little he resigned his shares. However, the fact that the current shareholders, which include several of his nephews, are loyal to him and that he is still in charge of Steaua are evident. The unofficial explanation for this situation is represented by the large number of unpaid taxes by the sports company that owned the club, AFC Steaua Bucharest, whose payment to the tax authority was thus avoided by transferring its assets to the newly formed company, while the old sports company was bankrupt and liquidation.

George Becali is a highly controversial person, whose involvement in club and team life has often been described as authoritarian and dictatorial by both the media and fans. Among Becali's most controversial decisions is the threat to sell out. the Steaua brand towards the tax authority after an unpaid tax scandal, using the club to promote the New Generation Christian Democratic Party - which he himself chairs -, the ban on playing Queen's music during stadium events for reasons of the sexual orientations of Freddie Mercury and the continuous dismissals of the coaches of the first team (culminating with that of Gheorghe Hagi).

Presidents

  • 1947-1948: Oreste Alecsandrescu
  • 1948-1948: Nicolae Petre Draga
  • 1948-1949: Vasile Mesaros
  • 1949-1949: Policarp Dovaăcescu
  • 1949-1951: Alexandru Florescu
  • 1952-1953: Edgar Gâță
  • 1953-1954: Alexandru Florescu
  • 1954-1954: Ilie Savu
  • 1954-1958: Stefan Alexiu
  • 1958-1961: Ioan Teodorescu
  • 1961-1964: Aurelian Budeanu
  • 1964-1975: Maximilian Pandele
  • 1975-1980: Gheorghe Draganescu
  • 1980-1983: Aurel Ion
  • 1983-1984: Cornel Oțelea
   
  • 1984-1985: Ioan Popescu
  • 1985-1989: Nicolae Gavrilă
  • 1989-1990: Constantin Tanase
  • 1990-1991: Nicolae Gavrilă
  • 1991-1997: Cornel Oțelea
  • 1997-1998: Cristian Gasu
  • 1998-2000: Gheorghe Cernat
  • 1998-2003: Viorel Paunescu
  • 2002-2007: Mihai Stoica
  • 2003-2007: George Becali
  • 2005-2007: Marius Lăcătuș
  • 2007-2010: Valeriu Argăseală
  • 2010-2015: Helmuth Duckadam
  • 2015-20 ??: Valeriu Argăseală
  • 2017-act .: Helmuth Duckadam

Hobby

According to a study carried out in June 2007, Steaua Bucharest is the most popular football club in Romania with around 42% of the national preferences, followed by Dinamo, with 12%, and Rapid, with a 9%.

Most of the Steaus fan mass is concentrated in Bucharest, particularly in the areas adjacent to the Stadionul Ghencea, covering the entire southern half of the Romanian capital, a city divided geographically by the Dâmboviţa River. Additionally, the club has a important fan base in the interior of the country, where several towns are renowned for having a vast majority of Steaua fans, and abroad, among Romanian emigrates.

The Steaua Ultra movement began in 1995, with the formation of the Armata Ultra (AU), the first group of organized ultras in Bucharest and the second in Romania, after the Commando Viola Ultra Curva Sud of Politehnica Timișoara. founding the group rapidly increased its membership, it was dissolved in 2001 due to internal problems. Currently, the hobby of steaua is made up of different groups, most of them located in the northern sector of Ghencea, called Peluza Nord, among which are Sharks Ferentari, Tineretului Korps, Titan Boys, Núcleo, Gruppo Tei, Skins Berceni, Insurgenţii , Armata 47, Ultras Colentina, Gruppo Est Voluntari, Triada, Roosters, while others are located in the southern sector, Peluza Sud, such as Ultras, Stil Ostil, Glas, Vacarm, Banda Ultra, among others.

In 2006, fans formed their own official association, which is called ISSA (in Romanian Asociaţia Independentă a Suporterilor Stelişti, in Spanish Independent Association of Steaua Fans). The ISSA was created as a legal entity in order to protect the interests and image of Steaua fans, in addition to promoting the values ​​of the club.

An intense topic of debate surrounding Steaua fans has to do with racism. Stems mainly from their rivalry with Rapid Bucharest, whose fans are often referred to as belonging to the gypsy people, the issue has on several occasions generated clashes between factions of fans of Steaua and Rapid. Additionally, during a match of Racist chants were heard from the Steaua fans in the 2005-06 UEFA Champions League preliminary round against Shelbourne FC, leading to Steaua's suspension from home field during the same European season for a party.

During the 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 seasons, fan-related incidents were one of the club's main problems. On 11 occasions for League I and 1 for the UEFA Cup, the club was punished with the suspension of its home for various reasons, including violence, chants and the use of flares.

Statistics

Steaua is the most successful club in Romanian football. With 62 seasons in League I, it is one of the only two teams that has always played in the first national league, together with Dinamo Bucharest (61 seasons). At the same time, the club holds the current record for the number of national championships (23), national cups (21) and national Super Cups (5). Between 1993 and 1998, their streak of six consecutive national titles won equaled that of Chinezul Timișoara since the 1920s. Internationally, it is the only Romanian team to have won continental trophies (the 1986 European Cup and the Super Cup of Europe in 1987) and has played the final of the European Cup in 1986 and 1989.

During three years and three months (June 1986-September 1989), Steaua stayed 104 games unbeaten in the league, setting, at that time, a world and European record that still stands. Also within the national league they had 112 matches between November 1989 and August 1996 undefeated at Stadionul Ghencea in League I. His streak of 17 consecutive victories in 1988 is another record, the same as that carried out by Dinamo a year later.

Tudorel Stoica is the player with the most appearances for Steaua in Liga I, as none of the current players have made it into the top 10 to date. The club's all-time top scorer in the league is Anghel Iordănescu with 146 goals. Other records are currently owned by former players such as Dorinel Munteanu (most matches played with the national team, with 134) or Gheorghe Hagi (goals scored with Romania, 35, more matches played in European competition, with 93).

  • Seasons in 1st: 60.
  • Seasons in 2st: 0.
  • Best position in First Division: 1º
  • Highest win achieved:
    • In national championships: 11-0 to Corvinul Hunedoara in 1988
    • In international tournaments: 6-0 to BSC Young Boys in 1979
  • Biggest win received:
    • In national championships: UT Arad 0-7 in 1947
    • In international tournaments: 0-5 Montpellier HSC in 1990
  • Longest streak without losing: 104 games (1986-1989)
  • Top scorer in First Division: Anghel Iordănescu (146 goals)
  • Most games played by First Division: Tudorel Stoica (368 games)
  • Goalkeeper least thrashed: Dumitru Stîngaciu 776 minutes without conceding goals (1993)

Players

Since its founding in 1947, Steaua's first team has been made up mostly of footballers of Romanian nationality. Tudorel Stoica is the footballer who has played the most official League I matches in the history of Steaua Bucharest, with 368 matches in two periods, 1978–1989 and 1991. After Stoica, other players who surpassed the barrier of 300 matches with the shirt of the Steaua are Marius Lăcătuş (357), Anghel Iordănescu (317) and Iosif Vigu (313). Anghel Iordănescu is also the top scorer for League I matches with 146 annotations between 1968 and 1982. Gheorghe Constantin (145), Victor Piţurcă (138) and Florea Voinea are other players who scored more than 100 goals for the club . On the other hand, with regard to titles obtained, Marius Lăcătuş is the player who has obtained the most championships playing for Steaua with 23 titles (10 of them from League I), being also the player who has obtained the most national championships in the Romanian football history.

Squad 2018/2019

Players Technical team
No. Nac. Pos Name Age Last team
janitors
12 Flag of Romania.svg 0BY Take Niga  23 years Flag of Romania.svg ACS Foresta Suceava
34 Flag of Romania.svg 0BY Cristian Balgradean  33 years Flag of Romania.svg CS Concordia Chiajna
99 Flag of Romania.svg 0BY Andrey Vlad  21 years Flag of Romania.svg CS U Craiova
Fenders
2 Flag of Romania.svg 1DEF Valentin Crețu  32 years Flag of Romania.svg Club Sportiv Gaz Metan Mediaș
3 Flag of Romania.svg 1DEF Ionuț Panțîru  25 years Flag of Romania.svg CS Știința Miroslava
15 Flag of Serbia.svg 1DEF Marko Momcilovic  33 years Flag of Romania.svg Pandurii Targu Jiu
16 Flag of Serbia.svg 1DEF Bogdan planić Captain sports.svg 3 °  29 years Flag of Serbia.svg FC Vojvodina
17 Flag of Romania.svg 1DEF Iulian Cristea  26 years Flag of Romania.svg Club Sportiv Gaz Metan Mediaș
18 Flag of Greece.svg 1DEF Aristeidis Soiledis  30 years Flag of Romania.svg Football Club Botoșani
48 Flag of Bulgaria.svg 1DEF Bozhidar Chorbadzhiyski  25 years Flag of Bulgaria.svg PFC CSKA Sofia
77 Flag of Romania.svg 1DEF Alexandru stan  32 years Flag of Romania.svg FC Astra Giurgiu
Flyer
5 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Mihai pintilii Captain sports.svg  36 years Flag of Israel.svg Hapoel Tel Aviv
6 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Dragoş Nedelcu  24 years Flag of Romania.svg FC Viitorul Constanţa
8 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Lucian Phillip Captain sports.svg 2 °  30 years Flag of Romania.svg CS Concordia Chiajna
11 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Olimpiu morutan  21 years Flag of Romania.svg Football Club Botoșani
14 Flag of Portugal.svg 2MED Thierry Moutinho  30 years Flag of Romania.svg CFR Cluj
20 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Ionuț Vînă  26 years Flag of Romania.svg FC Viitorul Constanţa
23 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Ovidiu Popescu  27 years Flag of Romania.svg ACS Poli Timisoara
26 Flag of Romania.svg 2MED Răzvan Oaida  23 years Flag of Romania.svg Football Club Botoșani
Forwards
7 Flag of Romania.svg 3OF Florinel Coman  22 years Flag of Romania.svg FC Viitorul Constanța
9 Flag of France.svg 3OF Harlem Gnohere  33 years Flag of Romania.svg Dinamo Bucureşti
10 Flag of Romania.svg 3OF Florin Tanase Captain sports.svg 4 °  26 years Flag of Romania.svg FC Viitorul Constanța
21 Flag of Romania.svg 3OF Ioan Time  32 years Flag of Turkey.svg Elazığs by Spor Kulübü
24 Flag of Portugal.svg 3OF Diogo Solomon  32 years Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg Al-Hazem Sport Club
27 Flag of Poland.svg 3OF Lukasz Gikiewicz  33 years Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg Hajer Football Club
47 Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg 3OF Juvhel Tsoumou  30 years Flag of Romania.svg FC Hermannstadt

{{Soccer player | no = 98 | nat = Romania | pos = DEL |

Coach (s)

Flag of Romania.svg Bogdan andone

Assistant Coach (s)

Flag of Romania.svg Christian Termure
Flag of Romania.svg Anton Petrea

Physical trainer (s)

Flag of Romania.svg Ciprian Prună

Goalkeeping coach (s)

Flag of Romania.svg Florin Tene

Physiotherapists)

Flag of Romania.svg Horea Codorean

Physician (s)

Flag of Romania.svg Flavian Aramitu


Legend
  • Pos : Position
  • Nac. : Sports nationality
  • Captain sports.svg Captain
  • Injury icon 2.svg Injured
  • BY / ARQ : Goalkeeper
  • DEF : Defending
  • MID / VOL : Midfielder
  • OF : Forward

Updated July 31, 2015

  • Injury icon 2.svg = Long-term injured
  • Captain sports.svg = Captain

trainers

Name Period Securities Total
Domestic International
LI CR SR UCL RCP UEFA SPC
Flag of Romania.svg Coloman Braun-Bogdan 02.1948–05.1948
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Colea Valcov 08.1948–07.1949
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Flag of Romania.svg Ferenc Ronay 03.1950–11.1950
09.1953–11.1953
03.1954–06.1954
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Flag of Romania.svg Gheorghe Popescu 03.1951–08.1953
08.1958–07.1960
03.1962–07.1962
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
7
Flag of Romania.svg Ilie savu 09.1954–11.1955
1958
08.1964–06.1967
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
3
Flag of Romania.svg Stefan Dobay 03.1956–11.1956
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Flag of Romania.svg Angelo Niculescu 03.1958–06.1958
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Stefan Onisie 09.1960–06.1961
08.1962–11.1963
08.1970–06.1971
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
Flag of Romania.svg Eugen mladin 08.1961–11.1961
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Gheorghe Wave 03.1963–07.1964
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Stefan Kovacs 08.1967–07.1970
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
3
Flag of Romania.svg Valentin Stanescu 08.1971–12.1972
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg George Constantin 03.1973–12.1973
08.1978–06.1981
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Flag of Romania.svg Constantin Teasca 03.1974–06.1975
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Emerich jenei 08.1975–06.1978
08.1983–05.1984
10.1984–10.1986
04.1991–12.1991
08.1993–04.1994
10.1998–04.2000
5
3
0
1
0
0
0
9
Flag of Romania.svg Traian Ionescu 08.1981–12.1981
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Constantin Cernăianu 11.1981–07.1983
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Florin Halagian 09.1984–10.1984
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Anghel Iordanescu 10.1986–06.1990
08.1992–06.1993
4
2
0
0
0
0
1
7
Flag of Romania.svg Costică Ştefănescu 08.1990–12.1990
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Bujor Hălmăgeanu 03.1991–04.1991
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Victor Piţurca 03.1992–06.1992
08.2000–06.2002
10.2002–06.2004
07.2010–08.2010
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
3
Flag of Romania.svg Dumitru Dumitriu 08.1994–06.1997
05.2005–06.2005
4
2
2
0
0
0
0
8
Flag of Romania.svg Mihai Stoichiţă 08.1997–10.1998
09.2009–05.2010
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
Flag of Romania.svg Cosmin Olăroiu 08.2002–10.2002
03.2006–05.2007
05.2011
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
Flag of Italy.svg Walter Zenga 08.2004–05.2005
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Ukraine.svg Oleh protasov 08.2005–12.2005
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Gheorghe Hagi 07.2007–09.2007
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Italy.svg Massimo Pedrazzini 09.2007–10.2007
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Marius Lacatus 10.2007–10.2008
01.2009–05.2009
09.2010–03.2011
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Dorinel Munteanu 10.2008–12.2008
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Italy.svg Christian Bergodi 06.2009–09.2009
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Ilie Dumitrescu 08.2010–09.2010
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Sorin Cârţu 03.2011–05.2011
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Gabriel Caramarin (acting) 05.2011
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Flag of Romania.svg Laurențiu Reghecampf 08.2002–10.2002
12.2015–05.2017
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Constantin Galca 06.2014–06.2015
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Nicolae Dica 12.2015
06.2017–12.2018
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Flag of Romania.svg Michael Teja 12.2018-
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total 1947- 23 21 5 1 0 0 1 51

History

Note: in bold font competitions currently in force.

National tournaments (57)
Flag of Romania.svg National competition Securities Runners-up
Romanian League . 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1959-60, 1960-61, 1967-68, 1975-76, 1977-78, 1984-85, 1985-86, 1986-87, 1987-88, 1988-89, 1992- 93, 1993-94, 1994-95, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1997-98, 2000-01, 2004-05, 2005-06, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15. (Record) 1954, 1957-58, 1962-63, 1976-77, 1979-80, 1983-84, 1989-90, 1990-91, 1991-92, 2002-03, 2003-04, 2006-07, 2007-08, 2015-16, 2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19.
Romanian Cup (23/8) 1948-49, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1955, 1961-62, 1966-67, 1968-69, 1969-70, 1970-71, 1975-76, 1978-79, 1984-85, 1986-87, 1987- 88, 1988-89, 1991-92, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1998-99, 2010-11, 2014-15, 2019-20. (Record) 1953, 1963-64, 1976-77, 1979-80, 1983-84, 1985-86, 1989-90, 2013-14.
Romanian Super Cup (6/5) 1994, 1995, 1998, 2001, 2006, 2013. (Record) 1999, 2005, 2011, 2014, 2015. (Record)
Romanian League Cup (2) 2014-15, 2015-16. (Record)
International tournaments (2)
World Flag 2004.svg International competition Securities Runners-up
UEFA Champions League (1/1) 1985-86. 1988-89.
European Super Cup (1) 1986
Intercontinental Cup (0/1) 1986

Consulted in August 2014 on its website

  • Marin Ciuperceanu, Cu echipa de fotbal Steaua pe două continent, Military Publisher, 1972. (in Romanian)
  • Marin Ciuperceanu, Reporter pentru Steaua, Military Publisher, 1978. (in Romanian)
  • Horia Alexandrescu, Steaua Campioana Europei, Military Publisher, 1986. (in Romanian)
  • Constantin Branco, Din culisele supercampioanei, Tempus SRL, 1994. (in Romanian)
  • Andrey Vochin, Super steaua, ProSport, 2001. (in Romanian)
  • Catalin Oprisan, Steaua - Legenda unei echipe de fotbal, CSA Steaua, 2008, ISBN 978-973-0-06160-4. (in Romanian)

Outlinks

  • Commons-logo.svg Wikimedia Commons hosts a multimedia category on Steaua from Bucharest.
  • Official Website (in English) (in Romanian)
  • Steaua Bucharest on Facebook
  • Steaua from Bucharest on Twitter
  • FC Steaua Bucharest in UEFA
  • FC Steaua Bucharest in FIFA