Serie A (Italy)

Serie A (Italy)

Serie A
Soccerball current event.svg LXXXIX Edition (2020-21)
Lega Serie A logo (since 2019) .png
General data
Venue Flag of Italy.svg Italy
Association Italian Football Federation (FIGC)
Foundation 6th October 1929
Serie A
Organized by Lega Series A (LNPA)
Sponsored by
Official TV
History
Champion Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC
runner-up Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale
Statistical data
Participants 20 equipment
Matches 342
Most laureate Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC (34 titles)
More presences Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale (88 editions)
Decline Italy Serie B
Classification a UEFA 2013 Champions League
Logo uefa europe 2012 Europa League
Chronology
National Division
(1926-29)
Serie A
Official site

La Italy Serie A - known for patronage reasons as Series A TIM- is the highest category in the Italian league system and the country's main club-level competition. It has been organized since 1946 by the Lega Nazionale Professionisti (LNP) after succeeding the Italian Football Federation (FIGC) and becoming in 2010 the Lega Nazionale Professionisti Serie A (LNPA), commonly known as Serie A LeagueIt began to be played in the 1929-30 season: since then, it has been held without interruptions, with the exception of the period between 1943 and 1945 due to World War II. The competition is the successor and correlative of the Italian national Championships that emerged. in 1898, being one of the oldest league tournaments in Europe, although it is not so with its current unified format of 1929.

Serie A is considered one of the five major European leagues together with the English Premier League, the Spanish First Division, the German Bundesliga and the Ligue 1 France, occupying third place in the UEFA coefficient, and according to the International Federation of Football History and Statistics (IFFHS), it is the first most relevant league in the world.

Since its founding in October 1929, twelve clubs have been proclaimed champions, in a track record led by Juventus Football Club with 34 titles, followed by the two great Milan clubs, Football Club Internazionale, and Associazione Calcio Milan, with 16 and 15 titles respectively.
Juventus FC, the reigning champions who have linked nine consecutive "Scudetti" since the 2011-12 season, is the only club to have won all possible continental competitions, along with the world champion title. AC Milan is one of the four clubs with the most international titles and the second with the most European champion titles (7), while FC Internazionale is the first and only Italian club to have achieved the treble. The confrontation between "Bianconeri"And "Nerazzurri", Is known as the "Derby d'Italia", While the disputed between the two Milan clubs, is the "Derby della Madonnina". Together with the three great clubs in the north of the country, the Associazione Calcio Firenze Fiorentina, the Società Sportiva Lazio, the Società Sportiva Calcio Napoli and the Associazione Sportiva Roma are known as the “seven sisters” (it. Seven Sisters) of Italian football.

Our Story

For the previous championships see Italian First Division

Giuseppe Meazza Derby Italy

Giuseppe Meazza, historical player of the two Milan teams (1933).

The championship started in 1898 as Federal Campionato (es. Federal Championship). The first dominator of the competition was Genoa Cricket & Football Club, winning six of the first seven editions. In addition to the Genoese club with nine championships in the amateur era, at that stage Pro Vercelli also stood out with seven conquests between 1908 and 1922. Between 1915 and 1919 the tournament was not played because of the First World War.

In 1929, with the professionalization of Italian football, it changed its name to Serie A or Campionato to girone unico (It is. Championship one round). During the 1930s, the Foot-Ball Club Juventus prevailed for five consecutive seasons (1935-XNUMX). For its part, Bologna became champion three more times. In this decade, players like Giuseppe Meazza stood out with Internazionale.

The 1943s were the golden age of the Associazione Calcio Torino, winning five championships. Between 1945 and XNUMX the competition had to be suspended again due to the Second World War.

Second half of the 20th century

During the fifties AC Milan and Juventus were the dominators. While the rosonero team had the Swedish forward formed by Gunnar Gren, Gunnar Nordahl and Nils Liedholm; At Juventus, Omar Sivori, John Charles and Giampiero Boniperti stood out. In 1956 Fiorentina achieved its first championship.

1951–52 AC Milan - Gunnar Nordahl Nils Liedholm and Gunnar Gren

Gunnar Nordahl, Nils Liedholm and Gunnar Gren, known as the Gre-no-li of Milan.

The decade of the sixties the championships were very distributed. The Inter Milan of the Spanish Luis Suárez Miramontes was the main dominator with three shields and three other runners-up. For their part, Milan and Juventus each won two championships, while Fiorentina won in 1969. In addition, in 1970 Cagliari won their only championship.

The first half of the eighties was dominated by Juventus led by Trapattoni and led by Michel Platini. It also highlights the surprising triumph of Hellas Verona in 1985 and the first Scudetto obtained by SCC Napoli in 1987, led by Argentine footballer Diego Armando Maradona. The Neapolitan team would also win the championship in 1990. In 1988, the great Milan of Arrigo Sacchi, technical director, and the Dutch Van Basten, Gullit and Rikjaard, burst onto the scene. For its part, Inter acquired the Germans Matthaus and Klinsman, proclaiming themselves champion in 1989.

The nineties were dominated by Milan de Capello and Juventus, with the exception of the title obtained by Sampdoria in 1991, the first and only one for the Genoese team.
Starting in the 1994/95 season, the current scoring system was established, awarding 3 points for each victory. In this decade, Serie A was consolidated as the most powerful league in Europe; Their clubs won more European titles than other leagues and the best players of the moment, such as Zidane, Ronaldo, Weah and Batistuta, landed in Italy.

Century XXI

The first two seasons of the new century were dominated by the two teams from the Italian capital. Lazio led by Pavel Nedvěd and Alessandro Nesta took the title in 2000, while the Associazione Sportiva Roma prevailed in 2001. Juventus won the title in the following two years, thanks to signings such as Gianluigi Buffon, Lilian Thuram or Nedvěd himself, after the sale of Zinedine Zidane to Real Madrid Football Club for 73 million euros. In 2004, the Associazione Calcio Milan won the championship after five years.

Marked by the scandal of the "Calciopoli", where the title was revoked from the Juventine club in favor of Inter Milan, also caused the 2006-07 season to be the first in which Juventus FC was not present in Serie A as it was penalized with relegation to the Serie B. In addition, several teams started the championship with penalty points. Two of the most important players of the Turin club would end up signing for Inter Milan as Zlatan Ibrahimović and Patrick Vieira, making them the favorite to win the title. Finally, Inter would take the title with a record of 97 points.

In the 2007-08 season, Inter Milan was crowned champion again in the year of its centenary and managed to seal three consecutive championships, to add another two more in 2008-09 with José Maurinho as coach, and in 2009-10; the first to get it in the century XXI after Torino Football Club and Juventus Football Club as the only ones to win five titles in a row.

With Juventus back in Serie A and after a brief triumph by Associazione Calcio Milan in the 2010-11 campaign, the new decade of Italian football in decline begins, with the overwhelming dominance of a Juventus led by Antonio Conte alongside players like Gianluigi Buffon, Giorgio Chiellini, Claudio Marchisio, Andrea Pirlo and Arturo Vidal. This Juventus in its first year coming from two seventh places is proclaimed undefeated champion after 38 days, a record for Italy of the new century after 23 wins and 15 draws in the 2011-12 season. The following year he wins again but leaving doubts about the number of defeats. In the 2013-14 season, Roma achieved the best season in their history, however, they failed to snatch the scudetto from Juventus, who won the championship after setting the best point record for a team from the main leagues in Europe with 102, product of 33 wins, 3 draws and 2 losses and winning all their home games.

Juventus F.C. - Serie A Champions 2016-17

Juventus from the years two thousand and ten.

The following year, in the 2014-15 season after the departure of Antonio Conte, Juventus signed Massimiliano Allegri. In that year, the coach made use of all the potential that his predecessor left him without removing tactical schemes, players or any iota of the characteristics that allowed Juventus to be crowned three-time champion; What's more, he endowed him with a new tactical scheme that allowed him to solve this year's games together with the previous one. This led to a new title, this time without opponents. Finally, Juventus entered a decline at the beginning of the following season, without any doubt due to the acclimatization of new players such as Paulo Dybala, Alex Sandro or Kedhira and the march of their reference in the midfield Andrea Pirlo, the lung Arturo Vidal and the offensive Carlos Tevez. However, he achieved a quick recovery (25 games, 24 wins 1 draw), leaving Juventus mathematically leading in the 2015-16 campaign. In this way, Juventus is crowned five-time champion of Italian football, thanks to its two coaches (Antonio Conte, and Massimiliano Allegri), both with great merit, the new stadium, the team and the board.

Midway through the 2019-20 championship, there was an outbreak of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2, a global viral pandemic that reached Europe from Asia. As different countries of the continent were registering cases of contagion and deaths, the Sports organizations began to take preventive measures and several of the matches scheduled in Italy were played behind closed doors (without an audience), or canceled, to halt their progress, the concern and contagions did not cease, and there were cases in soccer players and managers The CONI and FIGC decided to suspend the competition pending new events, a decision that was also made by UEFA with the Champions League and the Europa League, or La Liga with the Spanish championship. , to cite cases of similar magnitude.

Participants

Throughout the history of the competition, sixty-seven different teams have participated, and the Football Club Internazionale is the only one that has always contested the category since its inaugural edition. They are followed by 85 from Juventus Football Club and Associazione Sportiva Roma - with only one being the one that did not play -, 84 from Associazione Calcio Milan and 80 from Associazione Calcio Fiorentina. They are the only five teams that have played 80 or more seasons of the highest category of Italian football.

The oldest playing field in Italy is the Luigi Ferraris Stadium, with origins in January 22, 1911 and used by Genoa Cricket & Football Club and Unione Calcio Sampdoria. On the other hand, the one with the least longevity is the Juventus Stadium inaugurated in 2011, at which time it replaced the old one Stadio delle Alpi, located on the same land.

Although in the first years only between four and six teams participated, later on, the number gradually increased to the current twenty teams.

In the 2017-18 season, Benevento Calcio is promoted for the first time with the lowest budget in its category.

Season 2020-21

Note: indicated in parentheses the number of contested seasons of the competition.

2020-21 season teams
Flag of Lombardy.svg Atalanta BC
(75)
Flag of Campania.svg Benevento Calcio
(2)
Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC
(74)
Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan
(87)
Flag of Calabria.svg Crotone
(3)
Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli
(76)
Flag of Sardinia.svg Cagliari C.
(41)
Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Parma Calcio
(30)
Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina
(83)
Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma
(88)
Flag of Liguria.svg Genoa CFC
(54)
Flag of Liguria.svg UC Sampdoria
(72)
Flag of Veneto.svg Hellas Verona FC
(30)
Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg US Sassuolo Calcio
(8)
Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale
(89)
Flag of Liguria.svg Spice Football
(1)
Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC
(88)
Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC
(77)
Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio
(78)
Friuli-Venezia Giulia-Flag Udinese Calcio
(48)

Competition system

Scudetto.svg

Scudetto worn by the league champion.

The championship system is defined through clashes between all the clubs in round-trip matches, so that the club that obtains the highest score at the end of the tournament is proclaimed champion of Italy (it. campione d'Italia), receiving the trophy known as Italian Champions Cup (it. Coppa dei campioni d'Italia) and, since 1924, a badge in the form of a shield with the colors of the national flag, the Scudetto. In addition, the champion disputes the Italian Super Cup, against the winner of the Italian Cup that same season.

As of the 2017-18 season, the championship has six European seats: the first four classified will be those who have a place to play the Champions League, who qualify directly to the group stage. Finally, both the fifth and the sixth dispute the Europa League, together with the Cup champion.

History

For a better detail of each edition and its historical champions see History of the Italian First Division

Serie A is the European competition from which its clubs have won the highest number of international awards with 50. It has also produced the highest number of FIFA World Player winners with 10 and also its clubs have reached the UEFA Champions League final 25 times, having won 12 of those finals. Their teams have reached more finals than any other league.

Note: Names and flags of the teams according to the time.

Season Champion runner-up Third Notes
Serie A
1929-30 Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Liguria.svg Genoa CFC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1930-31 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC

1931-32 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma

1932-33 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC

1933-34 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli

1934-35 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina

1935-36 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC

1936-37 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC

1937-38 Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AS

1938-39 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter

1939-40 Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1940-41 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Ambrosiana Inter Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milano

1941-42 Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Veneto.svg Venezia FC

1942-43 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Tuscany.svg AS Livorno Calcio Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1943-44
League not contested by the Segunda Guerra Mundial
1944-45
1945-46 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

1946-47 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Modena FC
Lega Calcio succeeds FIGC as organizer
1947-48 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1948-49 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

1949-50 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1950-51 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1951-52 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1952-53 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svgJuventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

1953-54 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

1954-55 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Friuli-Venezia Giulia-Flag Udinese Calcio Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma

1955-56 Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1956-57 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio

1957-58 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina Flag of Veneto.svg Calcio Padova
First Champion Star Awarded
1958-59 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1959-60 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

1960-61 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1961-62 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina

1962-63 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

1963-64 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC (5) Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

1964-65 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC

1965-66 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli
Second Champion Star Awarded
1966-67 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC

1967-68 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1968-69 Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina (2) Flag of Sardinia.svg Cagliari Football Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

1969-70 Flag of Sardinia.svg Cagliari Football (1) Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

1970-71 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli

1971-72 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC

1972-73 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio

1973-74 Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli

1974-75 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma

1975-76 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC (6) Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

1976-77 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina

1977-78 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Veneto.svg Vicenza Calcium Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC

1978-79 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Umbria.svg AC Perugia Calcio Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC
Third Champion Star Awarded
1979-80 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC

1980-81 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli

1981-82 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma
Fourth Champion Star Awarded
1982-83 Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1983-84 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina

1984-85 Flag of Veneto.svg Hellas Verona FC (1) Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1985-86 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli

1986-87 Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1987-88 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma

1988-89 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

1989-90 Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli (2) Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1990-91 Flag of Liguria.svg UC Sampdoria (1) Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1991-92 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC
First undefeated champion
1992-93 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Parma FC

1993-94 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Liguria.svg UC Sampdoria

1994-95 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Parma FC

1995-96 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio

1996-97 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Parma FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

1997-98 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Friuli-Venezia Giulia-Flag Udinese Calcio

1998-99 Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina

1999-00 Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio (2) Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

2000-01 Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma (3) Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio

2001-02 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

2002-03 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lombardy.svg Milan AC

2003-04 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

2004-05 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale

2005-06 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

2006-07 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio

2007-08 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC

2008-09 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

2009-10 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale (16) Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

2010-11 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan (15) Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli
Lega Serie A succeeds Lega Calcio as organizer
2011-12 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan Friuli-Venezia Giulia-Flag Udinese Calcio
Undefeated champion
2012-13 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan

2013-14 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli
Highest champion score and fifth champion star awarded
2014-15 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio

2015-16 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma

2016-17 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli
2017-18 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma
2018-19 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli Flag of Lombardy.svg Atalanta BC
2019-20 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC (34) Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale Flag of Lombardy.svg Atalanta BC
Consecutive championship record (9)
In the 1943-44 season, the Divisione Nazionale was played, won by Spezia Calcio. The title is not recognized by the Italian Football Federation so it is not taken as a Scudetto true, and is therefore not considered official.

The 2004-05 and 2005-06 championships were revoked from Juventus by the Italian Court of Justice and the FIGC, as a result of the judgment of the trial for manipulation of Italian football matches. The one for the 2004-05 season was declared void. The one for the 2005-06 season was assigned to Inter Milan, third placed, behind the suspended Juventus and AC Milan.

History

The record includes exclusively Serie A tournaments, since 1929, where Juventus FC dominates the historical record with 34 championships, followed by 16 from FC Internazionale and 15 from AC Milan. Taking into account the aggregate of the First Division of Italy, with its predecessor championships, the same three teams with 36, 18 and 18 championships respectively are the most successful.

Club Securities Subtitles Years of the championships
Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC
34
17
1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, ​​1935, 1950, 1952, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1967, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2002, 2003, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale
16
15
1930, 1938, 1940, 1953, 1954, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1971, 1980, 1989, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan
15
15
1951, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1962, 1968, 1979, 1988, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2004, 2011
Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC
6
4
1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1976
Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC
5
3
1936, 1937, 1939, 1941, 1964
Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma
3
14
1942, 1983, 2001
Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli
2
8
1987, 1990
Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina
2
5
1956, 1969
Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio
2
3
1974, 2000
Flag of Sardinia.svg Cagliari Football
1
1
1970
Flag of Veneto.svg Hellas Verona FC
1
-
1985
Flag of Liguria.svg UC Sampdoria
1
-
1991
Flag of Liguria.svg Genoa CFC
-
1

Flag of Tuscany.svg AS Livorno Calcio
-
1

Flag of Veneto.svg LR Vicenza Virtus
-
1

Friuli-Venezia Giulia-Flag Udinese Calcio
-
1

Flag of Umbria.svg AC Perugia Calcio
-
1

Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Parma Calcio
-
1

  • The 2004-05 and 2005-06 championships won by Juventus were not awarded to the Turin team due to the 'Calciopoli' scandal.

Statistics

Historical classification

The 3952 points achieved by Juventus Football Club place it as the leader in the historical classification of the competition among the 68 teams that have ever participated in it. The second classified is the Football Club Internazionale, and the third, the Associazione Calcio Milan.Developed by Lega Serie A, it is based on the points achieved by each team in Serie A, based on the historical victory scoring system of two points, and establishing a historical record with the three point one. The following table covers the 1929-30 season through 2018-19.

The only club that has been present in all editions of the competition is the aforementioned FC Internazionale.


Note: Historical scoring system of 2 points per win. On Cursive teams without participation in the present edition.

Pos              Club Seasons Points PJ PG PE PP Pts. × 3 Securities % Success 1 % Success 2 Current Div
1. Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC 86 3952 2886 1583 786 517 5535 33 38.82 39.29 Serie A
2. Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale 87 3705 2924 1444 817 663 5149 16 18.82 18.82 Serie A
3. Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan 85 3596 2864 1377 850 637 4981 15 17.65 18.07 Serie A
4. Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma 86 3290 2886 1211 868 807 4501 3 3.53 3.57 Serie A
5. Flag of Tuscany.svg ACF Fiorentina 81 2976 2724 1078 835 811 4069 2 2.35 2.53 Serie A
6. Flag of Lazio.svg SS Lazio 76 2707 2586 973 768 849 3687 2 2.35 2.7 Serie A
7. Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli 73 2686 2432 963 761 708 3650 2 2.35 2.82 Serie A
8. Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC 75 2643 2496 913 818 765 3557 6 7.06 8.22 Serie A
9. Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC 72 2477 2422 862 761 799 3347 5 5.88 7.14 Serie A
10 Flag of Liguria.svg UC Sampdoria 62 2098 2126 713 673 740 2812 1 1.18 1.67 Serie A


Last update 13 de julio de 2020.

Historic scorers table

For complete details see Top scorers in the Italian First Division.

The Italian Silvio Piola is the top scorer in the competition with 274 goals, followed by his compatriot Francesco Totti and the Swede Gunnar Nordahl with 250 and 225 respectively. Italian Fabio Quagliarella is the active player with the most goals, with 173, while Nordic Nordahl has the best scoring record with 0,77 goals per game.

It should also be noted that the aforementioned Nordahl is one of the players who has scored the most goals in the top categories of European football, with 376 goals.

The records do not include matches from the previous championships of National Division, First Division, Premium Category, Italian Football Campionato y National Football Championship. Counting these records is Piola with 290 goals who tops the list, followed by Meazza's 262 and Totti's 250.

Final report: Accounted for matches and goals in play-off matches. On bold font active players in the competition.

Pos Player G. Go. avg Debut Debut team Other clubs
1 Flag of Italy.svg Silvio piola 274 537 0.51 1929 Flag of Piedmont.svg US Pro Vercelli (51) SS Lazio (143), Juventus FC (10), Novara Calcium (70)
2 Flag of Italy.svg Francesco Totti 250 619 0.40 1993 Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma (250)
3 Flag of Sweden.svg Gunnar Nordahl 225 291 0.77 1949 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan (210) AS Roma (15)
4 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Meazza 216 367 0.59 1929 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale (105) AC Milan (9), Juventus FC (10)
= Flag of ItaloBrasileno Double.svg José Altafini 216 458 0.47 1958 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan (120) SSC Napoli (71), Juventus FC (25)
6 Flag of Italy.svg Antonio Di Natale 209 445 0.47 2002 Flag of Tuscany.svg Empoli FC (18) Udinese Calcio (191)
7 Flag of Italy.svg Roberto Baggio 205 452 0.45 1985 Flag of Tuscany.svg AC Fiorentina (39)
8 Flag of Sweden.svg Kurt Hamrin 190 400 0.48 1956 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC (8)
9 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Signori 188 344 0.54 1991 Flag of Apulia.svg Foggia Calcio (11) SS Lazio (107), UC Sampdoria (3), Bologna FC (67)
= Flag of Italy.svg Alessandro Del Piero 188 478 0.39 1993 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus (188)
= Flag of Italy.svg Alberto Gilardino 188 514 0.37 1999 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Piacenza Calcium (3)
12 Flag of Argentina.svg Gabriel Batistuta 184 318 0.58 1991 Flag of Tuscany.svg AC Fiorentina (152) AS Roma (30) FC Internazionale (2)
13 Flag of Italy.svg Giampiero Boniperti 178 443 0.40 1946 Flag of Piedmont.svg Juventus FC (178)
14 Flag of Italy.svg amedeo amadei 174 423 0.41 1936 Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma (85) FC Internazionale (42), SSC Napoli (47)
15 Flag of Italy.svg Fabio Quagliarella 173 493 0.35 1999 Flag of Piedmont.svg Torino FC (18) Ascoli FC (3), Udinese Calcio (25), SSC Napoli (11), Juventus FC (23), UC Sampdoria (93)

Statistics updated until the last game played on March 21th 2021.

Silvio Piola Pro Vercelli

Silvio Piola, top scorer in the competition.

Players with the highest number of matches played

For a complete detail see Players with the most appearances in the Italian First Division.

The player with the most appearances in the history of Serie A is the Italian Gianluigi Buffon with 653 games, six ahead of Paolo Maldini who played a total of 647 during the 24 seasons in which he was active, and both followed by Francesco. Totti and his 619 games, and Javier Zanetti's 615. As of 2021, they are the only four above 600 matches.

Below are the twenty players with the most appearances in Serie A.

Final report: Accounted for matches and goals in play-off matches. On bold font active players in the competition.

Pos Player PJ Debut Debut team Other clubs
1 Flag of Italy.svg Gianluigi Buffon 653 1995-96 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Parma FC (168) Juventus FC (485)
2 Flag of Italy.svg Paolo Maldini 647 1984-85 Flag of Lombardy.svg AC Milan (647)
3 Flag of Italy.svg Francesco Totti 619 1992-93 Flag of Lazio.svg AS Roma (619)
4 Flag of Argentina.svg Javier Zanetti 615 1995-96 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale (615)
5 Flag of Italy.svg Gianluca Pagliuca 592 1987-88 Flag of Liguria.svg UC Sampdoria (198) FC Internazionale (165), Bologna FC (206), Ascoli (23)
6 Flag of Italy.svg Dino zoff 570 1961-62 Friuli-Venezia Giulia-Flag Udinese Calcio (4) Mantova (93), SSC Napoli (143), Juventus FC (330)
7 Flag of Italy.svg Pietro Vierchowood 562 1980-81 Flag of Lombardy.svg As a (30)
8 Flag of Italy.svg Roberto Mancini 541 1981-82 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Bologna FC (30) UC Sampdoria (424), SS Lazio (87)
9 Flag of Italy.svg Silvio piola 537 1929-30 Flag of Piedmont.svg US Pro Vercelli (127) SS Lazio (227), Juventus FC (28), Novara Calcium (155)
10 Flag of Italy.svg Enrico Albertosi 532 1958-59 Flag of Tuscany.svg AC Fiorentina (185) Cagliari (177), AC Milan (170)
11 Flag of Italy.svg Gianni rivera 527 1958-59 Flag of Piedmont.svg Alexandria (26) AC Milan (501)
12 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Bergomi 519 1979-80 Flag of Lombardy.svg FC Internazionale (519)
13 Flag of Italy.svg Alberto Gilardino 514 1999-00 Flag of Emilia-Romagna de facto.svg Piacenza Calcium (17)
14 Flag of Italy.svg Ciro Ferrara 500 1984-85 Flag of Campania.svg SSC Napoli (247) Juventus FC (253)
15 Flag of Italy.svg Giovanni Galli 496 1977-78 Flag of Tuscany.svg AC Fiorentina (259)

Statistics updated until the last game played on 1 January 2021.

Gianluigi Buffon 2014

Gianluigi Buffon holds the record for appearances in Serie A.

See also

  • Flag shirt of Europe.svg Portal: Soccer in Europe. Content related to Soccer in Europe.
  • Italian flag shirt Portal: Sport in Italy. Content related to Sport in Italy.
  • Italy soccer leagues system
  • Serie B
  • Italian Cup
  • Italian Super Cup
  • Serie A League
  • Historical classification of Serie A
  • Soccer in Italy
  • Annex: Football stadiums in Italy
  • World ranking of national leagues according to IFFHS

Outlinks

  • Commons-logo.svg Wikimedia Commons hosts a multimedia category on Serie A.
  • Official Web site
  • Serie A on UEFA.com
  • Serie A on FIFA.com
  • Serie A on Facebook
  • Serie A on Twitter
  • Serie A channel on YouTube.
  • Serie A on Instagram