First Division of Mexico

First Division of Mexico

Guard1anes Tournament 2021
mx-logo
General data
Venue Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico
Association Mexican Football Federation (FMF)
Foundation Amateur July 19, 1902
Professional October 17, 1943
No. of editions Amateur (1902-1942) - 38
Professional (1943-Act.) - 102
Organized by Mexican Football Federation (FMF)
Sponsored by
Official TV
History
Champion León
runner-up UNAM
Statistical data
Participants 18
Matches 17
First champion Amateur Orizaba AC
CF Asturias Professional
Most laureate Amateur Real Club Spain (11)
Professional Club América (13)
Decline Discontinued
Classification a Champion of Champions
Champions League
Chronology
Football League League MX
Official site

La First Division of Mexico also known simply as League MX or for sponsorship reasons BBVA MX League, Is the highest male category in the Mexican league system and the main club competition in the country. Since 2012 it has an autonomous organization with respect to the Mexican Football Federation. Two short tournaments are played per annual football cycle (each with its champion) called Apertura and Clausura (in that order). The championship is defined by means of a final phase after each regular phase, known as liguilla; the first twelve places in the general table classify her.

It is the most dominant league in the Concacaf area, obtaining (through its representative clubs) 44 official international titles. Recognized at the same time by the IFFHS as the strongest league of the 2010s in Concacaf; also as the 10th strongest league in the world in the same decade and the third strongest league on the continent, only behind the First Division of Argentina and Serie A of Brazil that occupy the 4th and 6th place respectively, while it was currently ranked during the year 2020 as the 29th league in the world.

The team that has obtained the most championships in the professional era is América with 13, followed by Guadalajara with 12, Toluca with 10, Cruz Azul and León with 8, UNAM and Tigres UANL with 7.

El National Classic, Also called Classic of Classics, is disputed between the América and Guadalajara clubs, the Classic Young between America and Cruz Azul, the Classic Capitalino between America and the National University, Classic Tapatío between Guadalajara and Atlas and Regiomontano Classic between Monterrey and Tigres.

Our Story

Origins

Liga MX Trophy

Trophy awarded to the champion of the Mexican league.

After the separation of several clubs from the Mexican League (founded in 1902) and which created the so-called National League (created in 1920); The antagonism and rivalry between both sectors ended two years later with the launch of a series of negotiations that would allow, not only the definitive unification of both leagues, but the creation of a structure that would organize and develop football in the country.

In August 1922 the Mexican Federation of Football Association was founded, which with everything and its Anglicism is the foundation of the current FMF; In its first statutes professionalism was recognized. This body is made up of the following clubs: Club de Fútbol México, Real Club España, Germania Fußball-Verein, Club América, Asturias Football Club, Club de Fútbol Aurrerá and Club Necaxa, the first directors being Humberto Garza Ramos, from Mexico, appointed president, Juan B. Orraca of the Aurrerá team as secretary and Manuel Alonso del Germania as treasurer, who registered and affiliated Femexfut with FIFA.

Immediately after the founding of the governing body, and with the consequent union of the two rival tournaments, the league championship was formally created, which they called FMF First Force Championship. The opening whistle of the 1922-23 season would be on the afternoon of Sunday, October 22, 1922. In the opening match America and Spain faced each other. The creams won 2-0 with scores from José Camote Izquierdo, scorer of the first goal, and Alfredo García Besné.

In the 1930-31 season, various managerial conflicts caused the suspension of the league tournament; the Federation decided to suspend it to definitively solve these problems. After months of fighting, they smoothed out rough spots and the competition was recast with the name Major League, which organized two competitions: the Preferential, made up of six teams, and the First Ordinary, which served as a promotion circuit. This competition was durable and grew until it grouped 16 teams.

Due to the expansion of the league, both in clubs and in number of players; and the increasing hiring of foreign soccer players, the Ministries of the Interior and Finance began to pressure the league and the clubs to present contracts and grant work permits in addition to complying with tax obligations for a simple reason, the players were already professionals and charged good amounts of money, but they were registered in various companies as employees, that is, they wanted to recognize the existence of the professional player to register him in the then Ministry of Labor and grant him all his labor rights, in addition to establishing his obligations to taxpayers. In the 1930s, among Spanish refugees, Cubans and reinforcements, 92 foreign players joined the league.

The pressures came from the late 1930s, when very high contracts were signed to Spanish players. This caused a crisis in 1942 when the National Federation (responsible for the National Amateur Championship) expressed its annoyance against the Mexican Football Federation and the Major League for sending professional players to the aforementioned inter-state championship, which evidently was an unfair advantage over the rest. of the state teams that lacked such status and succumbed with relative ease to the Major League team.

Thus, in April 1943, at the initiative of the president of the Club América César Martino, the league's member clubs agreed to yield to government pressure and the formal registration of the “soccer player” profession was promoted in the Ministry of Labor and the consequent taxes against the Treasury.

That is to say, the paradigm shift of the Major League championship that year had no relation whatsoever to a re-founding, change of name or statutes, nor to the beginning of a new competition format. In any case, it was a contractual and fiscal change in the relationship between the league and authorities, which did not affect the historical continuity of the tournament founded in 1922. In said assembly, the inclusion of Guadalajara and Atlas was approved.

Another phenomenon that occurred in 1943 was not actually a merger of the most important leagues in the country, but an inclusion of clubs from other circuits within the Major League, the only one affiliated with the Mexican Football Federation. Of the eight competing teams in the 1942-43 championship, six remained on the circuit: America, Atlante, Marte, Asturias, Spain and Moctezuma de Orizaba (the latter, a former member of the Veracruzana League and that he participated as a full member of the league and the FMF from 1941-42). Necaxa disappeared when he opposed the new measures taken by the Major League. The Jalisco Selection, a squad made up of players from the Guadalajara, Oro and Atlas clubs of the Liga de Occidente, who participated as a guest from 1940-41; also disappeared , to give way to the formal entry of the Atlas and Guadalajara clubs (Gold would do so until 1944-45) in the Major League. And to these we must also add the debuts of Veracruz (which was born from the merger of the clubs Iberia y Sporting who had already participated regularly in the Major League), and ADO of the Veracruzana League. In this way, in practice, the league only had an expansion of 4 clubs, and not a unification of tournaments.

Spain and Asturias, who had marked an era for their spectacular, offensive and effective style, were the first champions of the new stage; Asturias in 1943-44 and Spain in 1944-45, with two legendary strikers standing out: the Spanish Isidro Lángara, from Spain, and the Argentine Roberto Aballay, from Asturias, the only strikers with 40 goals in a season. It is worth mentioning that as a result of this aforementioned championship, Spain received the original league trophy as property, which it determined would award the first club to win five titles; a situation that would establish the continuity and direct connection between the First Force Championship and the current maximum circuit.

Except for Guadalajara, all the teams included foreign players in excessive proportion. On November 9, 1943, the FMF limited the number of foreigners per team to four. Because many of those affected began to naturalize, the President of the Republic, Manuel Ávila Camacho, decreed that for the 1945-46 season each team should participate (in Mexico City), with a minimum of six Mexican players per birth and for the next with seven at least.

Veracruz was the first champion of the interior of the republic, headed by Luis «Pirata» Fuente in the 1945-46 season. This season was characterized by the bulky scores and the high goal-per-game average.

Atlante was crowned champion in the 1946-47 season amid controversy. Most of the tournament the Lion and the Atlante would dispute the first place of the table; the penultimate match faced them and would define the winner. The meeting should have taken place in the city of León, but a current quarantine due to an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease caused the venue to be changed to the Olympic Stadium of the City of Sports, home of Atlante that, with the advantage of playing at home, the final zero tie awarded him the league title.

Lion's first titles

Successful was the association between Adalberto "Dumbo" López and León. As a member of this team, "Dumbo" López was the first Mexican striker to win three scoring titles in a row in the 1946-47, 1947-48 and 1948-49 matches. Meanwhile, León was proclaimed League Champion in the 1947-48 and 1948-49 seasons, and Copa México champion in 1948-49. The emerald team still continued their harvest of titles by winning the 1951-52 and 1955-56 championships. In two of these championships (1947-48 and 1955-56) he had to face tiebreakers against Gold, to obtain the scepter.

In administrative matters, the Major League ended up separating from the Federation and, after numerous negotiations and projects, both were unified in 1948, which is considered a re-founding of the FMF. Among the main reforms derived from the above, was to professionalize football, for this they created a "branch" with these characteristics separate from the amateur, therefore, the competition changed its name to be called Professional Branch Championship.

Years 1950-1960: The Champion Guadalajara

After having had the colloquial name of already merit—Due to steep declines in seasons where they were emerging as champions — Guadalajara became the most dominant dynasty of the time, winning four consecutive league championships between 1958-1962 and a total of eight in a 13-year span between 1957 and 1970. In that same period he won two titles in the Mexico Cup, in 1962 and 1970, and seven as Champion of Champions between 1957 and 1970. He also won the title of champion of the 1962 Concacaf Champions Cup. All of this under a nascent and massive popular support throughout the country, based on the sympathy that the public generated his condition of playing exclusively with players born in Mexico.

At the same time, clubs like Atlas (1950-51), Oro (62-63), Tampico (1952-53), Zacatepec (1954-55 and 1957-58), and Marte (1953-54), lived their best years obtaining their only league titles, and, coincidentally, in this period the capital clubs did not win any championship.

In this period the debuts in the First Division of Toluca (1953), Club Universidad Nacional (1962), and Cruz Azul (1964) took place, clubs that would become successful institutions in the history of Mexican soccer over the years. .

In the 1950-51 season the Second Division; the first team to descend was San Sebastián.

In 1960, with the election of Guillermo Cañedo de la Barcena as president of the FMF, many regulations and statutes were modified and, for now, the League became known as First Professional Division with everything and an autonomous and independent Steering Committee.

1970s: The Liguilla and the Cruz Azul Celestial Machine emerge

In order to obtain more economic income and make the league more competitive; Roberto Solís, president of the León Club proposed the realization of a postseason series, known as liguilla in which the best teams of the regular phase will face each other to obtain the title. The proposal was seconded by the Guadalajara and Toluca clubs. On November 23, 1970, the league championship competition format was approved; there was a tie in the first round of voting, since the counterpart, headed by América and Atlas, wanted the system of definition by points to be maintained; After two more rounds of voting, the casting vote of Alejandro Sarquís, president of the First Division Branch, decided to approve the format. As of the 1970-71 season, it is determined to divide the tournament into two groups of 9 teams and to play a final between the group leaders to define the champion. On July 25 in La Bombonera the first leg duel was played (ending with a 1-2 draw) and on August 0, the second leg of the first final between América and Toluca was played. The Cremas were crowned by beating the Diablos XNUMX-XNUMX at the Azteca Stadium.

Led by goalkeeper Miguel Marín, Cruz Azul dominated the 1970s by qualifying for 9 league teams, finishing 4 times as the overall leader and winning 5 league championships in the 1971-72, 1972-73, 1973-74, 1978- seasons. 79 and 1979-80.

In that decade, America also stood out with two championships (1970-71 and 1975-76), led by Enrique Borja and Carlos Reinoso; and the Pumas de la UNAM with a title (1976-77), and whose top figures were Evanivaldo Castro "Cabinho" and Hugo Sánchez, who debuted in 1976.

1980s: America and its golden age

In the 1982-83 season, America finished the regular season with 26 victories (17 at home), only 3 defeats, 61 points, and an 80% effectiveness; All these figures represented Mexican soccer records, but in one of the biggest surprises in history, Guadalajara eliminated them in the semifinals by beating them 3-0 (4-2 aggregate), at the Azteca Stadium. Guadalajara would not go any further, as it was defeated in the final by the team from the Strip, Puebla FC

In the following tournament, América took revenge from the previous league and beat Guadalajara 3-1 (5-3 aggregate) in the final, proclaiming itself champion of the 1983-84 season. In the 1984-85 season, he beat the Pumas in a third tiebreaker game and with controversial refereeing. In the short tournament PRODE 1985, he recovered from a disadvantage that he would obtain in the first leg (he lost 4-1), and beat Tampico Madero 4-0 in the second leg, to become three-time champion of Mexican soccer. He also won the titles of 1987-88 against Pumas de la UNAM and 1988-89 against Cruz Azul; His dominance in that decade included 4 overall leads, 10 appearances in the 11 matches played, as well as a Concacaf title in 1987 and two of the Champion of Champions in 1988 and 1989.

Tigres, Puebla and Monterrey break the capital's hegemony in league games with the titles of 1981-82, 1982-83 and Mexico 1986 respectively. Guadalajara achieves its first trophy in the league era, breaking a 17-year drought in the 1986-87 campaign.

1990s: El Necaxa, the percentage and short tournaments

The beginning of the 1990s saw Puebla once again crowned league champions in the 1989-90 season. That same year, the Strip was also proclaimed champion of the Mexico Cup, and by winning both titles in the same year, it managed to join the select group of "Campeonísimos".

In the 1991-92 season, the criterion popularly known as "percentage" was born to define the team that descends from the maximum circuit. This divides the points obtained during the last three seasons by the number of games played by each team. Then it would start from scratch, so the team to be relegated would be the one that finished in last place overall. In this way, Cobras de Ciudad Juárez has the unpleasant honor of being the first team fired from the First Division because of the "percentage".

Copying the format of the Argentine First Division, from 1996 two tournaments per year are played in Mexico, each one with its respective Liguilla, initially called Winter and Summer, and since 2002 Opening and Closing. Toluca, Pachuca and Santos are the teams that have benefited the most from this new form of competition, obtaining 7 championships the first and 6 titles the other two.

This decade is dominated by Necaxa, a club that obtained a two-time championship in the last 2 long seasons played in Mexico: 1994-95 and 1995-96, plus a short tournament in Winter 1998, in addition to their outstanding performances reaching the leadership general in 1992-93, the degree of Champion in 1994-95 winning the Mexico Cup and having only been absent in two of the league games played in that period. Toluca also excelled at the end of the decade by obtaining the titles Summer 1998, Summer 1999 and Summer 2000. In this period, clubs such as León, with 36 years (1991/92), Atlante, with 47 (1992/93), Cruz Azul with 17 (Inv. 97), and Toluca himself, with 23 (Ver. 1998), break long chains of years without a league championship. In the same way, institutions considered small due to their infrastructure, history and popularity make their debut as league champions: UAG (93-94), Santos (Inv. 96), Pachuca (Inv. 99) and Morelia (Inv. 2000).

2000s: The dynasties of Toluca, Pachuca and UNAM

The league that had a significant football growth in this decade, proof of this was that in the years 2002 2006 2007 and 2008 the first division was classified within the 10 best leagues in the world according to the IFFHS.

In this decade, three teams stood out in a special way:

  • The Toluca, who gets 4 titles: Apertura 2002, Apertura 2005, Apertura 2008 and Bicentennial 2010.
  • Pachuca, who gets 4 titles: Winter 2001, Apertura 2003, Clausura 2006 and Clausura 2007.
  • UNAM, not so much for obtaining 3 titles, but for the fact of having been the first team to achieve a double championship since short tournaments have been played: Clausura 2004 and Apertura 2004, this achieved under the technical direction of Hugo Sánchez.

The titles of América in Summer 2002, Monterrey in Clausura 2003, Guadalajara in Apertura 2006, and Atlante in Apertura 2007 also stand out, breaking streaks of 13, 17, 9 and 14 years without being champion, respectively.

2010s: Golden Age of Tigers

The decade begins with the fourth Monterrey crown in Apertura 2010. For the Apertura 2011, another broken streak is presented, being the Tigres club of the Autonomous University of Nuevo León who achieved their third championship after 29 years of not achieving it.

On June 4, 2012, a series of measures were announced to restructure the league, which included remodeling projects in the stadiums (such as removing meshes and fences, and covering all the localities with individual seats), reviving the tournament of Copa México, separate the Federation circuit, rename it as League MX and award the latter to a general sponsor.

This form of reorganization, which like the other modifications seen in the past, does not imply a profound change in the statutes, conflicts, labor rights of the players, transmission rights of the clubs and much less in the competition system; but they are understood and contemplated within a plan for its sporting growth.

In the sports field, this decade has already witnessed the obtaining of the fastest title for a recently promoted team, when Tijuana obtained the title in Apertura 2012 with just 59 games in the maximum circuit since its promotion in 2011. In addition to the achievement of the two-time championship to León's hands in Apertura 2013 and Clausura 2014, a team that had already achieved one in 1947-49. Likewise, it was marked as the decade in which Guadalajara, despite winning its 12th crown in 2017, would lose its hegemony as the team with the most titles in Mexican soccer, and America would take its place, after having conquered the tournaments. Closing 2013, Opening 2014 and Opening 2018 in said decade.

During the present decade, the team with the greatest constancy are the UANL Tigers, having been finalists on 7 occasions, obtaining 5 titles in them (Apertura 2011, Apertura 2015, Apertura 2016, Apertura 2017 and Clausura 2019); in addition to having concluded three times as general leader of the competition.

Participants

Throughout the history of the competition, sixty different teams have participated, only two of which have always remained in the first category since its inaugural edition. They are the Club América and the Club Deportivo Guadalajara.

Although only ten teams participated in the first season, later on the number gradually increased to the current eighteen teams. The figure of twenty-one was also reached during the 1986-87 season.

Season 2020-21

Note: indicated in bold font debut teams in the competition.

2020-21 season teams
Team Debut Presences In 1st since Series
Club América 1943-44 104 1943-44 104
Atlas FC 1943-44 101 1979-80 67
CD Cruz Azul 1964-65 83 1964-65 83
CD Guadalajara 1943-44 104 1943-44 104
Club Leon 1944-45 80 2012-13 17
FC Juárez 2019-20 3 2019-20 3
Mazatlan FC 2020-21 1 2020-21 1
CF Monterrey 1945-46 89 1960-61 87
Necaxa Club 1950-51 73 2016-17 8
CF Pachuca 1967-68 55 1998-99 45
Club Puebla 1944-45 84 2007-08 27
Queretaro FC 1990-91 33 2009-10 23
Athletic of San Luis 2019-20 3 2019-20 3
Santos Laguna 1988-89 57 1988-89 57
UANL Tigers 1974-75 70 1997-98 47
Club Tijuana 2011-12 19 2011-12 19
Deportivo Toluca FC 1953-54 94 1953-54 94
National University 1962-63 85 1962-63 85

Competition system

Regular season

News

The season is held annually, divided into two short tournaments, each with its own final phase (liguilla) and champion. Starting with the so-called tournaments of Opening at the end of the month of July or the beginning of August, and ending in the month of December. It closes with the so-called tournaments of Closing, which start in early January and end in late May or early June.

The competition consists of a single group made up of the 18 clubs that make up the maximum circuit, playing 17 games each, all against all in a single round; the order of the matches is decided by drawing lots before the start of the competition. The final classification is established according to the total points obtained by each team at the end of the championship. Corresponding to the first twelve places the pass to the final phase. Teams score three points for each game won, one point for each tie, and no points for games lost. If at the end of the 17 days of each tournament, two or more clubs are tied in points, their position in the general classification table will be determined according to the order of the following tiebreaker criteria:

  • 1. Better difference between goals scored and received.
  • 2. Greater number of goals scored.
  • 3. Greater number of goals scored as a visitor.
  • 4. Particular scores between the tied clubs.
  • 5. Best located in the general quotient table.
  • 6. Table fair play.
  • 7. Sweepstakes.

The board Fair Play It is the point system on which the number of yellow and red cards is counted, according to the following:

  • First yellow card 1 point.
  • Second yellow card (indirect red) 3 points.
  • Direct red card 3 points.
  • A yellow card and a direct red card 4 points.

Background

Classification

The competition system, from the 1922-23 season to the 1970 Mexico Tournament, established that the league champion was the team that ended up as the general leader of the competition (as in most of the leagues in the world); after playing free-for-all matches on a reciprocal visit (that is, two rounds), and defining the classification by a scoring system that awarded two units for victory, one for a draw and zero for defeat. The tiebreaker criterion to define the title was always the realization of direct confrontations between those involved, either in one or two duels on a neutral court, and even final phases if there were more than two involved; This system remained in force, also until the Mexico 1970 Tournament. However, only on eight occasions were extra games necessary for the title when there was a tie in the first place of the table; this was in the 1923-24, 1925-26, 1931-32, 1941-42, 1943-44, 1947-48 and 1955-56 tournaments, even in the 1933-34 campaign there was a triangular tie-breaker. But as of the 1970-71 tournament, the champion is defined by a direct elimination round qualification system, known as "League".

In the case of those positions in the table, which did not imply the definition of the title or the relegation (this from its creation in 1950-51), the first tiebreaker criterion was the goal average or average of goals, and was calculated dividing the number of goals scored by those received. Goal difference finally replaced this technique when it was applied from the 1970-71 season.

The scoring system was modified from the 1995-96 season, now awarding 3 points per victory.

Number of teams

The number of teams, originally eight, was increasing or decreasing either due to promotions, demotions, disappearances, invitations or leagues promotional. Going to nine in 1923-24, seven in 1924-25, eight in 1927-28, nine in 1928-29, eight in 1929-30, ten in 1932-33, six in 1933-34, five in 1935-36, six in 1936-37, seven in 1938-39, six in 1939-40, eight in 1940-41, 10 in 1943-44, 13 in 1944-45, 16 in 1945-46, 15 from 1946-47 to 1948- 49, 14 in 1949-50, 12 from 1950-51 to 1954-55, 14 from 1955-56 to 1963-64, 16 from 1964-65 to the 1970 Mexico Tournament, 18 from 1970-71 to 1973-74, 20 from 1974-75 to 1985–86, 21 in 1986-87, 20 in 1987-88 to 1993-94, 19 in 1994-95, 18 in 1995-96 to 2000–01, 19 in 2001–02, 20 in 2002– 03 to 2003–04, 18 from 2004–05 to 2018–19, 19 at Apertura 2019 and 18 again at Clausura 2020.

Calendar

The game calendar up to the 1949-50 season was determined by the then current conditions of transport and distance, so the games were divided into numbered weeks that could cover the games of only two or all of the tournament participants; this so that the same team could visit all the clubs in a city in a short period of time, avoiding the wear and tear and investment involved in covering long distances. As there was no predetermined order, there were no days as such. However, exceptionally, the 1934-35 season consisted of three rounds, the last of which was drawn for the order of locals and visitors. The division ordered by dates and the elaboration of a round of matches in the first and second round, with calendars of locations reversed from one half of the tournament to the other, began to be used in the 1950-51 season. Over the years, the massification of means of transport, the generalization of stadiums with lighting, the expansion of television, and various socio-economic factors, ended up defining the schedules.

Groups

As of the 1970-71 season, the clubs of the highest circuit were divided into groups, without changing the system of all-against-all confrontations. The location of the teams in the sectors was determined according to the final position in the general table of the previous campaign, and through a seeding that alternated the numbers of said positions in even and odd (that is, teams 1, 3, 5 , etc., in a group and vice versa). From the 1975-76 season to 2003–04, when they were divided into four groups, the location was determined by a staggered planting, with the sequence starting with seeds, these being the first four places of the previous contest (Group 1 - 1, 8, 9, 16, 17; Group 2 - 2, 7, 10, 15, 18; Group 3 - 3, 6, 11, 14, 19; Group 4 - 4, 5, 12, 13, 20), considering of course the differences in the number of members of one or two groups, according to the total number of members of the maximum circuit (remembering the aforementioned changes). From the 2004–05 season to 2010–11 there were only three groups, so the staggered order was compressed (Group 1 - 1, 6, 7, 12, 13, 18; Group 2 - 2, 8, 5, 11, 14, 17; Group 3-3, 4, 9, 10, 15, 16). The group format disappeared as of the 2011–12 cycle.

Short tournaments

Before the current format of short tournaments, 3 tournaments of shorter duration than the customary long competitions of double turn, prior to the 1970 and 1986 Soccer World Cups.

In the so-called C.P. 1970, the 16 teams were divided into two groups of 8 teams, in a first phase; which only faced rivals in their sector, in a duel over a reciprocal visit. Later in a second phase the 4 best of each group were located in a new sector called Championship, who again played round-trip matches, the leader of this sector, and which in the end was also the leader of the entire competition (and consequently the champion), would be Cruz Azul. While the worst 4 teams in each group of the first phase, were located in one called Downhill, they played roundtrip duels between them, however there was no relegation at the end of the tournament.

In PRODE 1985, the 20 teams were divided into 4 groups of 5, it was only played between the rivals of the sector to reciprocal visits, the 2 best teams from each sector qualified for the league.

For C.P. 1986 The 20 teams were divided into two groups, as in the previous ones, round-trip matches were played, only against opponents from the same group. The best 4 of each step into the league.

The current short tournament system was implemented from the 1996–97 football cycle. Each one has its own classification and final phase; only the calendar and the definition of the descent remain unified in the same cycle.

League

Current format

Prior to the quarterfinal round, there will be a reclassification phase in which clubs located between positions 5 and 12 of the general table will participate. They will play 5 vs. the 12, the 6 vs. on 11, 7 vs. 10 and 8 vs 9. The qualifying rounds will be played in one match, in the stadium of the club that is best located in the general table. The 4 winning clubs will relocate to places 5 to 8, depending on their position in the table, to play the quarterfinal stage.

The eight clubs qualified for the quarterfinal round of the tournament will be placed in direct duels according to their place in the general table at the end of matchday 17 (i.e. 1 vs 8, 2 vs 7, 3 vs 6 and 4 vs 5).

La League It consists of one-off reclassification duels and quarter-final, semi-final and final reciprocal visit matches. It is important to note that in the event of a tie in the overall score, for the quarterfinal and semifinal rounds, the first tiebreaker criterion is the away goal, and if the overall tie is maintained, the second criterion will be the overall position occupied in the regular tournament; thus, the team that has scored the most points is the one who will advance to the next round.

These criteria are annulled in the final by the title; Therefore, in this case, in the event of a global tie, there will be an extension with extra time and, if necessary, a penalty shoot-out.

Previous formats

Qualification to the final phase

The qualification system for the league has varied; although the constant had been that the classified teams were defined by their position in the pre-established groups at the beginning of each tournament. The classification corresponded to the teams located in the first two places in each group, regardless of their position in the general table. From the 1970-71 to 1974-75 seasons the teams were divided into two groups; from the 1975-76 season to 2003-04, they were divided into four (except for the aforementioned cases of the tournaments PRODE 1985 AND Mexico 1986); and from the 2004–05 cycle to the 2010–11 season, there were only three groups, so in this case the classification corresponded to the first two places in each group, and the two best third places. All the previous sector compositions, varying in number of members due to changes in the total of members of the maximum circuit.

As of the 2011–12 cycle, the groups disappear and the teams classify according to their position in the general table, that is, the first eight places until 2019-20, and the first twelve from 2020-21.

Rounds and participation

The first league in 1970-71 only consisted of the grand final, which the group leaders played on a reciprocal visit.

In 1971-72, 1972-73 and 1973-74 only the semifinals were played between leaders and sub-leaders of groups, to later make way for the final.

In 1974-75 a liguilla group of four teams, the leaders and sub-leaders of the two groups of the regular season participated. The 4 teams played a reciprocal visit and in the end the leader of the sector would be champion.

HR leagues 1976-77, 1978-79, 1979-80, 1980-81 and 1988-89 were played with two groups of 4 teams, all against all to reciprocal visits; the leaders played the final.

In the rest of the final phases it has been played under the direct elimination system. However, in 1991-92 the format of repechage or reclassification, so that teams with a higher score than the group sub-leaders could access the quarterfinal phase.

The format consisted of series to reciprocal visit between those teams involved with the aforementioned conditions, that is, the group sub-leader would face that club that had surpassed him in points in another group, and was not the sub-leader of this; all this respecting the position in the general table for the definition of the role of games, and considering the same tiebreaker criteria in force in subsequent rounds. Said system was suspended between Apertura 2004 and Clausura 2006, reestablished in Apertura 2006, suspended after its last dispute in Clausura 2008; and from Apertura 2020 it will be implemented again, but with a different format that will classify teams located between positions five and twelve at the end of the regular phase to a kind of preliminary round.

Tiebreaker criteria

In accordance with current regulations, in cases of a tie in the overall score, the tiebreaker criteria in the league have varied, even being different for the previous phases (reclassification, quarter-finals and semifinals) and for the final.

Previous phases
  • Between the seasons 1970-71 to 1973-74, a third tiebreaker match was contemplated for all phases (then only semifinals and final) to be played on a neutral court, and if equality, overtime and penalties persisted. The third match was used in three knockout series, including a final; In one of the semifinals the method was taken to the limit, since penalties were required to decide the third match (semifinal León - Atlético Español from 1973-74).
  • In the final home run of 1974-75, if there had been a tie between those involved for the championship, a one-game final was scheduled to be held on a neutral court.
  • From the 1975-76 season to the 1986 Mexico Tournament, overtime was played, and following the tie, penalty kicks (without taking into account the group leagues described later).
  • In the 1976-77 group final phase, the average number of goals or goal average. This criterion defined the classification to the final of U. de G. to the detriment of America.
  • On the contrary, in the group finals of 1978-79, 1979-80, 1980-81 and 1988-89, the traditional Goal Difference was used.
  • Between the 1986-87 and 1995-96 seasons it was decided under the criteria of Away goal, that is to say, the team that in the round trip series scored the most goals as a visitor. They proceeded to extra time and penalty kicks in case of having the same number of goals in both games; the goals in overtime were not valid for the visitor goal criterion, by virtue of the sports justice that should prevail, since in a reciprocal away series, only the second leg games have overtime.
  • Between Winter 1996 and Clausura 2012, the phases prior to the final (repechage, quarter-finals and semifinals) were defined by "best position in the general table", that is, in the event of a global tie, the best placed team qualified in the classification of the regular phase.
  • As of the Apertura 2012 tournament, the criterion applied is, once again, the away goal.
ending

On the other hand, in the case of the final, the tiebreaker criteria in case of equality in the global scoreboard have been (omitting the 1974-75 championship whose definition was not a final series, but a final homerun):

  • Third game on neutral court → In the seasons 1970-71, 1972-73, 1973-74; and from 1983-84 to 1984-85. However, it was only necessary to use it in 1972-73 and 1984-85, since in the rest there was no global tie.
  • Single match on neutral court → In 1971-72, it was the only time that the regulations predetermined a single venue for the final game, in the style of the Mexico Cup, and designating the Azteca Stadium for that purpose. Coincidentally, it would be two of its residents who reached this meeting.
  • Overtime and penalties → From the 1975-76 season to the 1982-83 season, and in the short tournaments of 1985-86. However, there was only a need to play overtime in 1981-82, 1982-83, Prode 1985 Tournament and 1986 Mexico Tournament; In the first two cases, even penalty shootouts were disputed, in the rest of the finals of this period there was no overall tie.
  • Away goal → Between the 1986-87 and 1995-96 seasons, and considering the same restrictions posed in the previous rounds. The criteria defined the titles of 1990-91 and 1995-96 in favor of Universidad Nacional and Necaxa, and to the detriment of América and Celaya respectively. The 1991-92 and 1993-94 finals required overtime, after both matches in both cases presented identical scores at the end of regular time (double 0-0 between León and Puebla in 1991-92; 1-0 for each location in the Santos-UAG series from 1993-94).
  • Golden goal → Between Winter 1996 and Closing 2004 this system was used throughout the world since the 1996-97 cycle. It consisted of declaring the end of the game, and consequently a winner, when a team scored the first goal of overtime. In the case of Mexico, it was only used in the championship series. During the 2003–04 cycle, the rule included a rule called Silver goal, by which, when a goal fell in the first half of extra time, the game was not considered over, the end of that period was expected and if one more goal from the rival did not fall, the end of the match was declared. The silver goal never occurred, instead the golden goal defined the titles of Winter 1997 and Summer 2002.
  • Since Opening 2004, extra and penal time are used again.

Descent and ascent

Home and Background

With the creation of the Second Division of Mexico in 1950, the dispute for the ascent-descent in the maximum circuit from the 1950-51 season. Between the 1950-51 and 1967-68 seasons, relegation was defined in the traditional way: the last place in the general table went to the Second Division.

In the 1968-69 season the league for not relegation, who disputed in series to reciprocal visit, the two or four clubs with the fewest points, as long as there were no more than four points of difference between those involved; in which cases there was a direct descent. In the 1984-85 season they were suspended as a result of the acts of violence that occurred at the Agustín Coruco Díaz Stadium, after an invasion of the field by Zacatepec fans, after the 1-0 defeat against Necaxa, which condemned to decline.

Latest format

In 1991-92 a system of descent was instituted that in Mexico was known colloquially as porcentaje o drop table. This consists of dividing the total of points obtained in a certain period of tournaments, by the number of matches played in that same period; The quotient obtained being the figure that defined the club that would descend, corresponding of course to the one with the worst record.

In that first contest, only the sum of the points corresponding to that campaign and the previous 1990-91 was considered to define the team that would descend; being from the 1992-93 campaign that the account of the last three seasons of all the teams began to accumulate. In the 1995-96 season, before the change in the scoring system, which went from giving 2 to giving 3 units per victory, for the only time a system was applied whereby the ratio table continued to accumulate two points per victory, this not to benefit or harm any team. After this tournament the percentage also accumulated three points for victory.

With the implementation of short tournaments from the 1996–97 cycle, the relegation system did not undergo substantial modifications, it was only adapted to the new tournament format. The tournaments remained unified as if it were a single season, so the two competitions of that football year were added to the last two long campaigns (1994-95 and 1995-96), and then the last of these to the cycles 1996-97 and 1997-98. Finally, from the 1998-99 cycle, the relegation format was definitively established as the quotient obtained by dividing the points obtained between the games played in the last six short tournaments (three football cycles). So technically it can be assumed that this produced every two short tournaments.

In the First Division, only one team descended - obviously, with the worst average - to the immediate division, in this case the Liga de Ascenso. For the newly promoted teams or with less than six seasons in the maximum circuit, their quotient was obtained by counting only the seasons that they had been playing. For this reason, his average could go up or down more easily. In the event that two or more teams had exactly the same average points per game, the team with the worst goal difference was relegated. If said tie was between two or more teams that do not have the same number of matches, the goal difference would be obtained by comparing only the tournaments in which those involved had coincided.

As a competition clause, the regulations stated that a team that occupies the last place in the relegation table could not access the Liguilla, even being placed in a position to qualify. This was approved after the 1995-96 season the Tigres of the Autonomous University of Nuevo León had descended and at the same time qualified in that tournament.

The place of the relegated team was occupied by the champion of the final for the promotion of the Liga de Ascenso, disputed by the two champions of the two short tournaments played in the season; in the event that a team obtained both titles, it was promoted automatically.

As of the 2017-18 cycle, the team that won the final due to promotion, had to be «Certified to be promoted», according to the FMF Regulations; otherwise, it could not be promoted and was «rewarded» with two millions of dollars; Therefore, the team relegated from the First Division and the certified club with the most points in the Promotion League (adding the two tournaments), disputed a round trip promotion to determine which team occupied a place in the highest circuit. However, for the 2019-20 cycle, the Mexican Football Federation agreed that all Ascent MX participants would have the right to ascend to the highest category, automatically granting them certification.

Suspension

The Mexican Football Federation determined on April 24, 2020, in full paralysis of Mexican tournaments due to the Covid-19 pandemic, to cancel the 2020 Clausura Tournament of the Promotion League, to disappear this league, the promotion and relegation in First Division for 6 years, while consolidating a second category suitable for Mexican soccer; all this due to the constant economic crises that the teams of the promotion circuit had been going through in recent years and that forced, in many cases, the disappearance of teams, with the consequent reduction of participants in said league.

Participation in international tournaments

Concacaf Champions League

The Concacaf Champions League is the highest confederative competition that Mexican clubs can play. The champions and runners-up of the Apertura and Clausura tournaments have access to it. By disposition of the Concacaf, the champions and runners-up of Mexico are obliged to participate only in the aforementioned competition, this in order to increase the expectation and competitiveness of the same.

Copa Libertadores

Although the participation of Concacaf clubs in Conmebol tournaments does not correspond, the competitiveness and relevance of its maximum tournament in international football, the Copa Libertadores, led the Mexican league to negotiate with the South American organ its participation in the south-continental tournament where Between 1998 and 2003, four or even eight Mexican teams were invited to play a selective tournament between them, played in the United States, to later play two direct places in the group stage of that competition. These were contested against Venezuelan clubs in the PreLibertadores tournament, who exchanged their places in exchange for a percentage of tickets and television rights.

In 2004, Conmebol granted two direct places to Mexico (in 2005, it increased to three via repechage), with which the classification system changed: The current champions, the year before the contest, faced each other for the ticket called Mexico 1, tickets 2 and 3 were disputed in a tournament called InterLiga, played in the United States, by the 8 best placed teams in a general table that included the two short tournaments of the season.

Those teams that were champions in the two league tournaments of the year were discarded to play the Copa Libertadores that season, this due to Concacaf's provision so that the winners of the league in Mexico will play the area tournament and thus have to wait, two years minimum, to aspire to play the South American competition.

As of the 2010-2011 season, a new classification system was implemented:

  • Mexico 1: The general leader of the Apertura tournament of each year regardless of whether he is champion.
  • Mexico 2: Second place in the general table of the Apertura tournament each year.
  • Mexico 3: The champion of the Supercopa MX, a tournament played between the two champions of the soccer cycle within the Mexico Cup. (The latter, implemented from the 2013-14 season, previously corresponded to the third best placed in the Apertura tournament).

However, the change in format and calendar of the South American tournament in 2016, caused the Mexican teams to decide not to participate since the 2017 edition.

Other Conmebol tournaments

Since the first edition of the Merconorte Cup in 1998, the Mexican league had already received an invitation from Conmebol to play this tournament; However, the differences between the South American body and the local federation on the designation of the invited clubs (CONMEBOL invited América, Guadalajara and Cruz Azul; the Federation wanted to send Necaxa and Toluca) prevented the debut of the Mexican teams in this competition.

The Mexican clubs began their participation in the Copa Merconorte 2000, being the representatives Guadalajara, Necaxa, Pachuca and Toluca. Guadalajara, Necaxa and Santos Laguna participated in Merconorte 2001, which was its last edition. In both tournaments there were no sports classification criteria, since all participants acted by invitation.

For the 2005 South American Cup, Conmebol invited three Concacaf teams for the first time, two of them Mexican: América and Universidad Nacional; Although the reason for the invitation was their condition as the last two league champions of Mexican soccer, this was not the regulatory criterion, since they participated as guests.

However, from the 2006 South American Cup, two classification criteria were used for invited teams. On the one hand, the team with the best position in the general table of the Clausura Tournament of the current year classified, conditioned not to be a participant in the Concacaf Champions Cup that same semester; and on the other, the runner-up in the Concacaf Champions Cup of that year, played in the first semester, was classified; Norm that on the two occasions of its validity, the qualified ones were found to be Mexican clubs. This criterion was also used in the 2007 edition (Pachuca participated as a defending champion tournament). In the 2008 edition, a new method was applied, classifying now, the two best placed in the general table of the Clausura Tournament, and who were not participants in the Concacaf club championship.

According to Concacaf guidelines, Mexican soccer stopped participating since the 2009 edition, despite the fact that the Mexican Soccer Federation confirmed Monterrey and Puebla as participants that year.

Pachuca, as champion of the 2006 Copa Sudamericana, obtained the right to play the 2007 Recopa Sudamericana against Internacional de Porto Alegre from Brazil, champion of the 2006 Copa Libertadores, in a round-trip series to define the winner of the two champions of Conmebol.

History

For a better detail of each edition see History of the First Division of Mexico

Below is the list of championships including the amateur period (unofficial from 1902 to 1922) and the professional period (official from 1922 to the present).

Note: Team names according to the time.

Season Champion Result runner-up Notes
Mexican League of Foot-ball Association
1902-03
Orizaba AC AC reform
Amateur era
1903-04
Mexico Cricket Club AC reform
Amateur era
Mexican League of Football Amateur Association
1904-05
Pachuca AC British club
Amateur era
1905-06
AC reform Mexico Country Club
Amateur era
1906-07
AC reform British club
Amateur era
1907-08
British club Mexico Country Club
Amateur era
1908-09
AC reform Pachuca AC
Amateur era
1909-10
AC reform Popo Park FC
Amateur era
1910-11
AC reform Mexico Club
Amateur era
1911-12
AC reform British club
Amateur era
1912-13
Mexico Club Pachuca AC
Amateur era
1913-14
Club Spain Rovers FC
Amateur era
1914-15
Club Spain Pachuca AC
Amateur era
1915-16
Club Spain Pachuca AC
Amateur era
Mexican League of Fans of Foot-ball Association
1916-17
Club Spain Pachuca AC
Amateur era
1917-18
Pachuca AC Deportivo Español
Amateur era
1918-19
Club Spain Union Center
Amateur era
1919-20
Pachuca AC Mexico Club
Amateur era
1920-21
Champion not recognized due to administrative disagreements between participants
Amateur era
1921-22
Champion not recognized due to administrative disagreements between participants
Amateur era
FMF First Force Championship
1922-23
CF Asturias Germania FV
Amateur era
1923-24
RC Spain
2-1
Club América
Amateur era
1924-25
Club América Necaxa Club
Amateur era
1925-26
Club América
1-0
CF Asturias
Amateur era
1926-27
Club América RC Spain
Amateur era
1927-28
Club América CF Asturias
Amateur era
1928-29
CD Mars RC Spain
Amateur era
1929-30
RC Spain Club América
Amateur era
1930-31
Suspended due to administrative disagreements between participants
Amateur era
Major League Preferred Championship
1931-32
CF Atlante
1-0
Necaxa Club
Amateur era
1932-33
Necaxa Club CF Atlante
Amateur era
1933-34
RC Spain
2-1
CF Asturias
Amateur era
1934-35
Necaxa Club Club América
Amateur era
1935-36
RC Spain Club América
Amateur era
1936-37
Necaxa Club CF Atlante
Amateur era
1937-38
Necaxa Club CF Asturias
Amateur era
1938-39
CF Asturias Basque Country Selection
Amateur era
1939-40
RC Spain Necaxa Club
Amateur era
1940-41
CF Atlante Selection of Jalisco
Amateur era
1941-42
RC Spain
5-4
CF Atlante
Amateur era
1942-43
CD Mars CF Atlante
Amateur era
1943-44
CF Asturias
4-1
RC Spain
Beginning of the professional era
1944-45
RC Spain Puebla

1945-46
Veracruz CF Atlante

1946-47
CF Atlante Club Leon

1947-48
Club Leon
2-0
CD Gold

1948-49
Club Leon Atlas

FMF Professional Branch Championship
1949-50
Veracruz CF Atlante

1950-51
Atlas CF Atlante

1951-52
Club Leon CD Guadalajara

1952-53
Tampico Zacatepec

1953-54
CD Mars Gold

1954-55
Zacatepec CD Guadalajara

1955-56
Club Leon
4-2
Gold

1956-57
CD Guadalajara Toluca

1957-58
Zacatepec Toluca

1958-59
CD Guadalajara Club Leon

1959-60
CD Guadalajara Club América

Professional First Division League Championship
1960-61
CD Guadalajara Gold

1961-62
CD Guadalajara Club América

1962-63
Gold CD Guadalajara

1963-64
CD Guadalajara Club América

1964-65
CD Guadalajara Gold

1965-66
Club América Atlas

1966-67
Toluca Club América

1967-68
Toluca UNAM

1968-69
Cruz Azul CD Guadalajara

1969-70
CD Guadalajara Cruz Azul

Mexico '70 Tournament
MEX. 1970
Cruz Azul CD Guadalajara

Professional First Division League Championship
1970-71
Club América
2-0
Toluca

1971-72
Cruz Azul
4-1
Club América

1972-73
Cruz Azul
5-4 (of.)
Club Leon

1973-74
Cruz Azul
4-2
Athletic Spanish

1974-75
Toluca
Club Leon
Title defined under league system
1975-76
Club América
4-0
U. of G.

1976-77
UNAM
1-0
U. of G.

1977-78
Tigers UANL
3-1
UNAM

1978-79
Cruz Azul
2-0
UNAM

1979-80
Cruz Azul
4-3
Tigers UANL

1980-81
UNAM
4-2
Cruz Azul

1981-82
Tigers UANL
2-2 (3-1, pen.)
CF Atlante

1982-83
Puebla
2-2 (7-6, pen.)
CD Guadalajara

1983-84
Club América
5-3
CD Guadalajara

1984-85
Club América
4-2 (of.)
UNAM

Prode '85 and Mexico '86 Tournaments
PRODE 85
Club América
5-4 (pro.)
Tampico-Madero

MEX. 1986
Monterrey
3-2 (pro.)
Tampico Madero

Mexican League Championship
1986-87
CD Guadalajara
4-2
Cruz Azul

FMF League Championship
1987-88
Club América
4-2
UNAM

1988-89
Club América
5-4
Cruz Azul

1989-90
Puebla
6-4
U. of G.

1990-91
UNAM
3-3 (V)
Club América

1991-92
Club Leon
2-0 (pro.)
Puebla

1992-93
CF Atlante
4-0
Monterrey

1993-94
Tecos UAG
2-1 (pro.)
Santos Laguna

League Championship of the First Professional Division
1994-95
Necaxa Club
3-1
Cruz Azul

1995-96
Necaxa Club
1-1 (V)
Athletic Celaya

Mexican League Championships of the First Professional Division Winter and Summer
INV. nineteen ninety six
Santos Laguna
4-3
Necaxa Club

WATCH. 1997
CD Guadalajara
7-2
Bulls Neza

INV. nineteen ninety six
Cruz Azul
2-1 (go)
Club Leon

WATCH. 1998
Toluca
6-4
Necaxa Club

INV. nineteen ninety six
Necaxa Club
2-0
CD Guadalajara

WATCH. 1999
Toluca
5-5 (5-4, pen.)
Atlas

INV. nineteen ninety six
Pachuca
3-2
Cruz Azul

WATCH. 2000
Toluca
7-1
Santos Laguna

INV. nineteen ninety six
Monarchs Morelia
3-3 (5-4, pen.)
Toluca

WATCH. 2001
Santos Laguna
4-3
Pachuca

INV. nineteen ninety six
Pachuca
3-1
Tigers UANL

WATCH. 2002
Club América
3-2 (go)
Necaxa Club

Mexican League Championships of the First Professional Division Opening and Closing
APR. 2002
Toluca
4-2
Monarchs Morelia

CLA. 2003
Monterrey
3-1
Monarchs Morelia

APR. 2003
Pachuca
3-2
Tigers UANL

CLA. 2004
UNAM
1-1 (5-4, pen.)
CD Guadalajara

APR. 2004
UNAM
3-1
Monterrey

CLA. 2005
Club América
7-4
Tecos UAG

APR. 2005
Toluca
6-3
Monterrey

CLA. 2006
Pachuca
1-0
saint Louis

APR. 2006
CD Guadalajara
3-2
Toluca

CLA. 2007
Pachuca
3-2
Club América

APR. 2007
CF Atlante
2-1
UNAM

CLA. 2008
Santos Laguna
3-2
Cruz Azul

APR. 2008
Toluca
2-2 (7-6, pen.)
Cruz Azul

CLA. 2009
UNAM
3-2 (pro.)
Pachuca

APR. 2009
Monterrey
6-4
Cruz Azul

BICEN. 2010
Toluca
2-2 (4-3, pen.)
Santos Laguna

APR. 2010
Monterrey
5-3
Santos Laguna

CLA. 2011
UNAM
3-2
Monarchs Morelia

APR. 2011
Tigers UANL
4-1
Santos Laguna

CLA. 2012
Santos Laguna
3-2
Monterrey

APR. 2012
Tijuana
4-1
Toluca

CLA. 2013
Club América
2-2 (4-2, pen.)
Cruz Azul

APR. 2013
Club Leon
5-1
Club América

CLA. 2014
Club Leon
4-3 (pro.)
Pachuca

APR. 2014
Club América
3-1
Tigers UANL

CLA. 2015
Santos Laguna
5-3
Querétaro

APR. 2015
Tigers UANL
4-4 (4-2, pen.)
UNAM

CLA. 2016
Pachuca
2-1
Monterrey

APR. 2016
Tigers UANL
2-2 (3-0, pen.)
Club América

CLA. 2017
CD Guadalajara
4-3
Tigers UANL

APR. 2017
Tigers UANL
3-2
Monterrey

CLA. 2018
Santos Laguna
3-2
Toluca

APR. 2018
Club América
2-0
Cruz Azul

CLA. 2019
Tigers UANL
1-0
Club Leon

APR. 2019
Monterrey
3-3 (4-2, pen.)
Club América

CLA. 2020
Tournament ended due to the COVID-19 pandemic
SAVE. 2020
Club Leon
3-1
UNAM


  • In the seasons 1923-24, 1925-26, 1931-32, 1941-42, 1943-44, 1947-48 and 1955-56 there was a tie for the first place in the table and extra games were played for the title. While in the 1933-34 campaign there was a triple tie at the top and a triangular final was played.

  • The end of the 1971-72 season was defined in a single game between Cruz Azul and Club América at the Azteca Stadium.

  • In 1974-75 the league consisted of a group round between the 4 clubs that occupied the first 2 places of the two groups in which the 20 teams of the regular phase were divided: Club León, Toluca, Cruz Azul and Unión de Curtidores. It was disputed all against all to reciprocal visit; the winner of the group would be the champion. The Toluca 1-0 León match on the fifth day defined the title in favor of Toluca; It is not a final as such, since the regulations in force at the time did not contemplate the realization of a.

History

Club Securities Subtitles Years of the championships Runner-up years
CF America
13
10
1965-66, 1970-71, 1975-76, 1983-84, 1984-85, P-1985, 1987-88, 1988-89, V-2002, C-2005, C-2013, A-2014 and A- 2018
1959-60, 1961-62, 1963-64, 1966-67, 1971-72, 1990-91, C-2007, A-2013, A-2016 and A-2019
CD Guadalajara
12
9
1956-57, 1958-59, 1959-60, 1960-61, 1961-62, 1963-64, 1964-65, 1969-70, 1986-87, V-1997, A-2006 and C-2017
1951-52, 1954-55, 1962-63, 1968-69, M-70, 1982-83, 1983-84, I-1998 and C-2004
Deportivo Toluca FC
10
7
1966-67, 1967-68, 1974-75, V-1998, V-1999, V-2000, A-2002, A-2005, A-2008 and B-2010
1956-57, 1957-58, 1970-71, I-2000, A-2006, A-2012 and C-2018
CD Cruz Azul
8
11
1968-69, M-1970, 1971-72, 1972-73, 1973-74, 1978-79, 1979-80 and I-1997
1969-70, 1980-81, 1986-87, 1988-89, 1994-95, I-1999, C-2008, A-2008, A-2009, C-2013 and A-2018
Club Leon
8
6
1947-48, 1948-49, 1951-52, 1955-56, 1991-92, A-2013, C-2014 and G-2020
1946-47, 1958-59, 1972-73, 1974-75, I-1997 and C-2019
National University
7
8
1976-77, 1980-81, 1990-91, C-2004, A-2004, C-2009 and C-2011
1967-68, 1977-78, 1978-79, 1984-85, 1987-88, A-2007, A-2015, G-2020
CF Tigres UANL
7
5
1977-78, 1981-82, A-2011, A-2015, A-2016, A-2017 and C-2019
1979-80, I-2001, A-2003, A-2014, C-2017
Santos Laguna
6
5
I-1996, V-2001, C-2008, C-2012, C-2015 and C-2018
1993-94, V-2000, B-2010, A-2010 and A-2011
CF Pachuca
6
3
I-1999, I-2001, A-2003, C-2006, C-2007 and C-2016
V-2001, C-2009 and C-2014
CF Monterrey
5
6
M-1986, C-2003, A-2009, A-2010 and A-2019
1992-93, A-2004, A-2005, C-2012, C-2016 and A-2017
Atlante FC
3
4
1946-47, 1992-93 and A-2007
1945-46, 1949-50, 1950-51 and 1981-82
Necaxa Club
3
3
1994-95, 1995-96 and I-1998
I-1996, V-1998 and V-2002
Club Puebla
2
2
1982-83 and 1989-90
1944-45 and 1991-92
CA Zacatepec
2
1
1954-55 and 1957-58
1952-53
CD Veracruz
2
-
1945-46 and 1949-50
CD Gold
1
5
1962-63
1947-48, 1953-54, 1955-56, 1960-61 and 1964-65
Atlas FC
1
3
1950-51
1948-49, 1965-66 and V-1999
CA Monarcas Morelia
1
3
I-2000
A-2002, C-2003 and C-2011
RC Spain
1
1
1944-45
1943-44
Tecos FC
1
1
1993-94
C-2005
CF Asturias
1
-
1943-44
CD Tampico
1
-
1952-53
CD Mars
1
-
1953-54
Club Tijuana
1
-
A-2012
U. of G.
-
3

1975-76, 1976-77 and 1989-90
Tampico Madero FC
-
2

P-85 and M-86
Athletic Spanish
-
1

1973-74
Athletic Celaya
-
1

1995-96
Bulls Neza
-
1
V-1997
St. Louis FC
-
1

C-2006
Queretaro FC
-
1

C-2015

Statistics

For a complete statistical summary of the competition see Statistics of the First Division of Mexico

Historical classification of regular phase

Below is the historical table of the regular phase of the First Division (1943-Apertura 2020), in which the data does not include final phases, matches for the title or second place, or promotion or relegation matches.


Note: Historical scoring system of 2 or 3 points per win. On Cursive teams without participation in the 2020-21 circuit.

Pos              Club PJ PG PE PP GF GC diff Points
1 Club América 2525 1076 743 706 4063 3243 820 3280
2 CD Guadalajara 2525 1009 771 745 3666 3090 576 3110
3 Deportivo Toluca 2277 918 664 695 3365 2755 610 2886
4 Cruz Azul FC 2001 855 635 511 3133 2329 804 2717
5 Atlas FC 2431 835 685 911 3450 3612 . 2649
6 C. National University 2053 799 606 648 3044 2625 419 2522
7 CF Monterrey 2159 770 647 742 3013 3050 . 2517
8 CF Atlante 2234 788 643 803 3326 3255 71 2431
9 Club Leon 2045 807 556 682 3160 2803 357 2368
10 Club Puebla 2025 679 593 753 2733 2886 . 2172

Historic scorers table

For a complete detail see Top scorers of the First Division of Mexico
Pos Player G. Liga LGL Go. avg Period Clubs
1 Flag of Brazil.svg Evanivaldo Castro 312 289 23 429 0.72 1974-87 UNAM (151), Atlantean (108), León (44) Tigres (9)
2 Flag of Mexico.svg Carlos Hermosillo placeholder image 294 269 25 539 0.54 1984-01 America (78) Monterrey (20), Blue Cross (169), Necaxa (13), Atlantean (7), Guadalajara (7)
3 Flag of Mexico.svg Jared borgetti 252 211 41 475 0.53 1994-10 Atlas (21) Santos (189), Gold (8), Pachuca (8), Blue Cross (7), Monterrey (10) Puebla (5), Morelia (4)
4 Flag of Paraguay.svg Jose Cardozo 249 206 43 332 0.75 1994-05 Toluca (249)
5 Flag of Mexico.svg Horacio Casarin 238 238 - 326 0.73 1936-57 Atlante (107), Zacatepec (24), Spain (21), Necaxa (70) America (13) Monterrey (3)
6 Flag of Chile.svg Osvaldo castro 214 210 4 398 0.53 1971-84 America (45), Jalisco (91), Neza (45), Atletico Potosino (24), UNAM (9)
7 Flag of Mexico.svg Luis Alves 209 184 25 577 0.36 1986-03 America (162), Atlantean (24), Necaxa (23)
8 Flag of Mexico.svg Adalberto Lopez 201 201 - 231 0.87 1942-55 Atlantean (10), León (126) Atlas (14), Gold (27), Guadalajara (24)
9 Flag of Brazil.svg Eloir Perucci 199 192 7 398 0.50 1972-84 Laguna (66), Athletic Spanish (86), Cruz Azul (47)
10 Flag of Mexico.svg Sergio Lira 191 182 9 564 0.33 1978-96 Tampico (36), Atlante (2), Oaxtepec (20), Tampico Madero (102), Tigres (18) Puebla (13)
11 Flag of Mexico.svg Ricardo Pelaez 187 170 17 1985-00 America (33) Necaxa (138) Guadalajara (16)
12 Flag of Brazil.svg Ricardo Ferretti 182 175 7 1977-91 Atlas (9), UNAM (116), Neza (6), Monterrey (9), Toluca (43)
13 Flag of Mexico.svg Horacio Lopez 172 160 12 1967-80 America (39), Blue Cross (133)
14 Flag of Uruguay.svg Richard Brandon 172 159 13 1971-83 Atlético Español (55), Veracruz (45), Toluca (33), Atlético Potosino (15), Peasant Athletes (12), Oaxtepec (9)
15 Flag of Mexico.svg Enrique Borja 168 166 2 1964-77 UNAM (69) America (99)

Statistics updated until the last game played on December 13 2020.
Jared borgetti

Jared Borgetti, Mexico's second all-time top scorer.

Players with the highest number of games played

For a complete detail see Players with the most presence in the First Division of Mexico
Pos Player Go. Liga LGL Period Clubs
1 Flag of Mexico.svg Oscar Perez 741 664 77 1993-19 Blue Cross (417), Tigres (30), Chiapas (30), Necaxa (34), Saint Louis (62), Pachuca (168)
2 Flag of Mexico.svg Oswaldo Sanchez 725 631 94 1993-14 Atlas (81) America (76) Guadalajara (272) Santos (296)
3 Flag of Mexico.svg Benjamin Galindo 700 633 67 1979-01 Tampico (73), Tampico Madero (135), Guadalajara (296) Santos (101), Blue Cross (72), Pachuca (20)
4 Flag of Mexico.svg Juan Pablo Rodriguez 685 595 90 1997-18 Atlas (203), Tecos (107), Guadalajara (13) Santos (294), Morelia (68)
5 Flag of Chile.svg Flag of Mexico.svg Rodrigo ruiz 638 582 56 1994-12 Puebla (65), Neza Bulls (132), Santos (294), Tecos (130), Veracruz (17)
6 Flag of Mexico.svg Adolfo Rios 635 582 53 1986-04 UNAM (166), Vera Cruz (247), Necaxa (71) America (141)
7 Flag of Mexico.svg Miguel Spain 631 573 58 1983-03 UNAM (410) Tigres (34) Santos (187)
8 Flag of Mexico.svg Alfonso Sosa 610 563 47 1985-04 UdeG (226), Puebla (73) León (71) Monterrey (34), Blue Cross (36), Pachuca (138) Querétaro (32)

9 Flag of Brazil.svg Sinha 609 524 85 1999-17 Monterrey (17), Toluca (548), Queretaro (44)
10 Flag of Mexico.svg Christopher Ortega 608 534 74 1974-92 America (608)

Statistics updated until the last game played on December 13 2020.
Oscar Perez-Rojas

Óscar Pérez, player with the most games in the League.

1 Benjamín Galindo played all three games of the league for not relegation corresponding to the 1981-82 season with Tampico, a series in which he would lose the category to Atlas, these duels are part of his history of games in the First Division.
In bold, active players and their current club

Coaches with the most directed games

Data updated to Opening 2020

No. Coach PT LG LL Period Equipment
1 Flag of Brazil.svg Ricardo Ferretti 1157 1012 145 1991 - UNAM (346), Guadalajara (160), Tigers (554), Toluca (58), Morelia (38)
2 Flag of Mexico.svg Ignatius Trelles 1081 1033 48 1951-1991 Zacatepec (198), Mars (22), America (78), Toluca (204), Puebla (115), Cruz Azul (266), Atlante (78), UdeG (120)
3 Flag of Mexico.svg Victor Manuel Vucetich 816 735 81 1990 - León (141), UAG (125), Tigres (67), Cruz Azul (26), La Piedad (28), Puebla (19), Pachuca (46), Veracruz (26), Jaguares (19), Monterrey (190 ), Querétaro (111), Guadalajara (18)
4 Flag of Chile.svg Carlos Reinoso 800 740 60 1981-2017 América (221), Tampico Madero (122), Atlas (30), Tigres (116), Toros Neza (38), Veracruz (125), León (55), Atlante (25), San Luis (22), UAG ( 23), Querétaro (28)
5 Flag of Mexico.svg Enrique Meza 799 704 95 1982 - Cruz Azul (262), Morelia (58), Toros Neza (46), Toluca (179), Atlas (30), Pachuca (172), Puebla (45), Veracruz (7)
6 Flag of Mexico.svg alberto war 789 731 58 1975-2003 Atlético Potosino (166), Guadalajara (370), UdeG (122), Toros Neza (47), León (18), La Piedad (7), Tigres (8), UAG (51)
7 Flag of Argentina.svg Ricardo La Volpe 781 725 56 1983 - Atlante (248), Oaxtepec (33), Ángeles de Puebla (57), Guadalajara (18), Querétaro (38), Atlas (196), Toluca (83), Monterrey (38), America (34), Chiapas (36 )
8 Flag of Uruguay.svg Carlos Miloc 770 730 40 1961-1998 Tigres (211), Irapuato (164), Morelia (52), America (24), Pachuca (34), Torreón (22), Veracruz (41), San Luis Potosí (44), UAG (44), Guadalajara (38 ), Tampico Madero (54), Correcaminos UAT (5), Cobras (30), León (7)
9 Flag of Mexico.svg Antonio Carbajal 702 674 28 1961-1994 Atlético Morelia (409), León (151), Union of Tanners (142)
10 Flag of Mexico.svg Javier De la Torre 693 685 8 1955-1984 Guadalajara (397), Celaya (15), Jalisco (112), UdeG (150), UAG (19)

In bold, active coaches and their current club


  • Alberto Guerra directed 11 games to Atlético Potosino in 1975-76 in a duet with Ciro Barbosa, these games are included in his account.
  • Carlos Miloc, led 50 games to Irapuato between 1967-69 and 30 to Morelia in 1966-67 in duet with Fernando Reynoso and Alberto Gálvez respectively, they are also included in his account.
  • Ricardo La Volpe directed the 44 games of the 1988-89 season (38 in the league and 6 in the league) in a duo with Rafael Puente at Atlante.

Technical directors with more titles

No. Coach Securities Period Equipment Championships
1 Flag of Mexico.svg Ignatius Trelles 7 1951-1991 Marte (1), Zacatepec (2), Deportivo Toluca (2), Cruz Azul (2) 1953-54, 1954-55, 1957-58, 1966-67, 1967-68, 1978-79, 1979-80
Flag of Brazil.svg Ricardo Ferretti 7 1991 - Guadalajara (1) UNAM (1) Tigers UANL (5) V1997, C2009, A2011, A2015, A2016, A2017, C2019
3 Flag of Mexico.svg Raul Cardenas 6 1966-1998 Blue Cross (5), America (1) 1968-69, Mexico 1970, 1971-72, 1972-73, 1973-74, 1975-76
4 Flag of Mexico.svg Javier de la Torre 5 1955-1984 Guadalajara (5) 1960-61, 1961-62, 1963-64, 1964-65, 1969-70
Flag of Mexico.svg Manuel Lapuente 5 1978-2013 Puebla (2) Necaxa (2) America (1) 1982-83, 1989-90, 1994-95, 1995-96, V2002
Flag of Mexico.svg Victor Manuel Vucetich 5 1990 - León (1), Tecos (1), Pachuca (1) Monterrey (2) 1991-92, 1993-94, A2003, A2009, A2010
7 Flag of Mexico.svg Enrique Meza 4 1982 - Toluca (3), Pachuca (1) V1998, V1999, V2000, C2007
8 Flag of Hungary.svg Arpad Fekete 3 1957-1990 Guadalajara (2), Gold Club (1) 1958-59, 1959-60, 1962-63
Flag of Mexico.svg Jose Manuel de la Torre 3 2006 - Guadalajara (1), Toluca (2) A2006, A2008, Bicentennial 2010
Flag of Argentina.svg Anthony Mohammed 3 2011 - Tijuana (1) America (1) Monterrey (1) A2012, A2014, A2019

In bold, active technicians.

Television rights and broadcasts

Broadcast rights for open television or national network of 11 First Division teams, they are distributed between Televisa, TV Azteca and Grupo Imagen. While in the systems of PayTV or restricted is distributed between Televisa (through its subsidiaries TUDN, SKY Sports, Adrenalina Sports Network and Afizzizados, in which you can have preselected matches from TV Azteca and your own company, to be broadcast exclusively through any of these channels), ESPN, FOX Sports, Claro Sports and Chivas TV.

The companies that own the international rights to Mexican Soccer are Azteca América, ESPN Deportes (USA), Fox Sports, TUDN, Telemundo, and Al Jazeera.
In September 2011, the Brazilian company Traffic acquired the television rights of the Mexican Football League and the Mexican National Team from the Mexican Federation, according to a report made public by the Sports Pro consultancy and ESPN Brasil also broadcasts it. The agreement was until the 2014 World Cup.
And in turn, Traffic resold the television rights to the Arab network Al Jazeera for the territories of the Middle East, North Africa and France, also until 2014.
The Asian network has 16 transmission channels via the Internet that are called AlJazeerasport.tv and where a Mexican League game is broadcast a week, there is no defined method of election.
This means of communication has the possibility of having an impact in 23 countries in the Middle East and North Africa, which allows it to be observed in countries such as Iran or Qatar. Also Oromar TV and Oromar HD from Ecuador have rights to transmit it. In Central America it is broadcast by ESPN Latin America, Fox Sports and TUDN. Eurosport broadcasts across much of Europe.

See also

  • Flag shirt of the Americas.svg Portal: Soccer in America. .
  • Coat of arms of Mexico.svg Portal: Mexico. Content related to Mexico.
Seasons of the First Division of Mexico Flag of Mexico.svg

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• 1970
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Related tournaments Other divisions Related articles Attachments
  • Mexico Cup
  • Champion of Champions
  • Mexican Super Cup
  • FMF / Major League First Force Championship
  • Mexican League of Football Amateur Association
  • Tower Cup
  • Knockout Cup
  • National Amateur Championship
  • Mexican Women's First Division
  • Mexican soccer league system
  • Mexico Promotion League
  • Promotion Champion (Mexico)
  • Expansion League MX
  • Second Division of Mexico
  • Mexico Serie A
  • Mexico Series B
  • Mexican Second Division Cup
  • Third Division of Mexico
  • Amateur Sector of Mexican Soccer
  • Soccer in Mexico
  • Mexican Football Federation
  • Mexican clubs in CONMEBOL tournaments
  • Official titles of Mexican soccer clubs
  • International titles of Mexican soccer clubs
  • Soccer Hall of Fame (Mexico)
  • Ballon d'Or (Mexico)
  • Mexican soccer classics
  • Annex: Soccer stadiums in Mexico
  • Annex: Top Mexican scorers in history
  • The strongest League in North and Central America of the XXI Century.
  • Annex: Historical classification of the First Division of Mexico
  • Annex: Clubs participating in the First Division of Mexico
  • Annex: Data and brands of the First Division of Mexico
  • Annex: Relegation in the First Division of Mexico
  • History of the First Division of Mexico
  • Annex: TV Transmission Rights of the First Division of Mexico

  • Special Record: La Liga Apertura 2014, NOTMUSA SA de CV, Mexico 2014.

Outlinks

  • Wikinews-logo.svg Wikinews has news related to First Division of Mexico.
  • Official Site of the Liga BBVA MX