first League

first League

first League
Soccerball current event.svg LXXXVII Edition (2020-21)
League NOS logo
General data
Venue Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal
Association Portuguese Federation
Football (FPF)
Foundation 20 January 1935
No. of editions 86
Organized by Professional Football League (LPFP)
Sponsored by
Official TV
History
Champion Flag of Porto.svg FC Porto (29 titles)
runner-up Lisbon municipal flag SL Benfica
Third Lisbon municipal flag SC Portugal
Statistical data
Participants 18 equipment
Matches 306
Most laureate Lisbon municipal flag SL Benfica (37)
More presences
Decline Segunda Liga
Classification a UEFA Champions League
UEFA Europa League
Official site

La first League, Also known as Portugal First Division or for sponsorship reasons such as Call us, is the highest category of the Portuguese soccer league system. It began to be disputed in the 1934/35 season under the name of «Experimental League». As of the 1938/39 season, it replaced the National Championship to designate the Portuguese champion, and since then it has been held without interruptions.

The championship was established by the most important regional federations of the time: Lisbon, Porto, Setúbal and Coimbra, so that the participants were the prominent clubs of each district. As of the 1945/46 edition, the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF) opens the tournament to all of continental Portugal with the current division system, although the archipelagos of Azores and Madeira were excluded for logistical reasons until the 1970s. .

Since the 1995/96 season, the first League It is organized by the Portuguese Professional Football League (LPFP), whose members are the participating clubs themselves. The only categories with professional status in Portugal are First and Second Division, both under the umbrella of the LPFP, while the rest of the divisions depend on the FPF and its corresponding regional federations.

Although as many as 71 teams have participated for at least one season, only five have been crowned league champions. The three most important clubs in Portugal —Sport Lisboa e Benfica, Futebol Clube do Porto and Sporting Clube de Portugal— have won all but two editions; the rest have been for Clube de Futebol Os Belenenses (1945-46) and Boavista Futebol Clube (2000-01).

Our Story

Background

The antecedents of the Portuguese league system can be found in the Portugal Championship, a direct elimination tournament played between 1922 and 1938 by the winners of each district tournament.

With the establishment of professionalism, the four most important regional federations of the time —Lisbon, Oporto, Setúbal and Coimbra— agreed to create a League championship similar to those already existing in other countries, although the Portuguese Football Federation maintained the Championship National for economic reasons The new «Experimental League» was held in the 1934/35 season and consisted of eight participants: SL Benfica, Sporting CP, CF Os Belenenses and União FL (Lisbon); FC Porto and Académico FC (Porto), Vitória FC (Setúbal) and Académica (Coimbra) To choose participants, the regional results of the previous year would be taken into account. Porto would be proclaimed champion of the first edition, while Benfica would win the next three.

In 1938, the Portuguese Football Federation confirmed that the winner of the league championship would be considered the country's champion, while the old Portuguese Championship would be transformed into the Portuguese Cup. The first winner under the new nomenclature was also FC Porto . The quotas by districts remained intact, with an extension in the 1941/42 season to admit the champions of Braga and Algarve.

Starting with the 1945/46 edition, a complete reform of the system was made to introduce promotions and demotions, thus eliminating regional restrictions. The First Division had 14 participants, the Second Division was divided into groups and a Third Division divided into regions was created. Only clubs from mainland Portugal could participate for logistical reasons, so the Azores and Madeira entities were excluded until the 1970s.

"The Big Three"

Eusebio Benfica

Eusébio, top scorer in the Portuguese league for seven seasons with SL Benfica.

Performance of the «big three» in the last 10 seasons
Season Sport Lisboa e Benfica Football Club Porto Sporting from Portugal
2010–11 2 1 3
2011–12 2 1 4
2012–13 2 1 7
2013–14 1 3 2
2014–15 1 2 3
2015–16 1 3 2
2016–17 1 2 3
2017–18 2 1 3
2018–19 1 2 3
2019–20 2 1 4

The Portuguese First Division has been dominated since its inception by three teams: Sport Lisboa e Benfica, Sporting Clube de Portugal and Futebol Clube do Porto. They are known nationally as "the big three" (in Portuguese, The Three Greats) Because only between them have they won all the editions disputed, with the exceptions of CF Os Belenenses in 1945/46 and Boavista FC in 2000/01. Furthermore, they are the only ones who have played every season since 1934.

Within this domain three stages can be distinguished. The end of the 1940s and almost the entire 1950s were dominated by the Sporting Clube de Portugal of the «Five Violins»: Fernando Peyroteo, Manuel Vasques, Albano, José Travassos and António Jesus Correia. protagonist to SL Benfica of Eusébio and José Águas, winner of the European Champions Cup in 1960 and 1961 under the orders of the Hungarian Béla Guttmann. And at the end of the 1962s, FC Porto joined the fight, with the arrival to the presidency of Pinto da Costa would become the second Portuguese club in number of titles.

With the dominance of the "big three" undisputed, since the 1970s there have been changes in the competition format. As of the 1971/72 season, participation was increased to 16 teams, and the 1987/88 and 1988/89 editions had up to 20 rivals. However, the competitive level suffered and the LPFP had to lower it to 18 participants, the current format.

Creation of the Professional League (LPFP)

Although Portuguese football was already professionalized, it was not until the 1995/96 academic year that the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF) transferred the organizational powers of the First Division to the Portuguese Professional Football League (LPFP), an organization constituted exclusively by the clubs. participants and claiming that right since 1978. Under the new situation, the LPFP became responsible for the regulation, organization and management of professional competitions. The rest of the divisions were kept under the supervision of the FPF, which would end up transferring the Second Division in 1999. Since then, the highest category is called first League.

The other big change has been the approval of the Bosman law (1995) and the elimination of the limit of foreign soccer players, mostly Brazilian. The only restriction established by the LPFP is that clubs must include "at least eight players" trained in Portugal for three seasons before turning 21. The percentage of foreigners in the Portuguese league was 52% in the 2013/14 season.

In the 2000s the championship was shaken by the "golden whistle" case, after the Portuguese justice accused several personalities of attempting to corrupt the arbitration establishment. Among those involved was Jorge Nuno Pinto da Costa, president of the FC Porto, and Valentim Loureiro, former president of Boavista FC The LPFP sentenced Boavista to an administrative demotion in 2008, while Pinto da Costa was suspended for two years and Porto had six points deducted. However, Boavista appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport and it agreed with him, for which he had to be readmitted as of the 2014/15 edition.

The good performance of the Portuguese teams in European competitions has increased the UEFA coefficient of the national league, reaching sixth position in 2017.

Competition system

The Portuguese First Division is a tournament organized and regulated (together with the Second Division and the League Cup) by the Portuguese Professional Football League (LPFP), whose members are the participating clubs themselves.

The competition is held annually, beginning in late August or early September, and ending in May of the following year.

The First Division consists of a single group made up of eighteen teams, belonging to football clubs or sports corporations (SAD). Following a league system, they will face everyone against everyone on two occasions: once in their own field and another in the opposite field, until a total of 34 days have been played. The order of the matches is decided by lottery before the start of the competition.

The final classification is established according to the total points obtained by each team at the end of the championship. Teams score three points for each game won, one point for each tie, and no points for games lost. If at the end of the championship two teams equal points, the mechanisms to tie the tie are as follows:

  1. The one with the greatest difference between goals for and against according to the result of the matches played between them.
  2. The one with the highest goal difference in favor taking into account all those obtained and received during the course of the competition.
  3. The club that has scored the most goals.

In the event that the tie on points persists, the LPFP may organize a tiebreaker match between the clubs involved.

The team that scores the most points at the end of the championship will be proclaimed league champion and will obtain the automatic right to participate in the group stage of the next edition of the UEFA Champions League, the second classified will play the previous round to access the group stage of said competition. The third has a direct position to the UEFA Europa League, fourth classified will obtain the right to participate in the play-off of the next UEFA Europa League from the third round, while the Portuguese Cup champion goes directly to the group stage, in case the champion of that cup has his place in Europe, the fifth place will participate in the « play-off »of the UEFA Europa League. The league champion will play the Portuguese Super Cup, facing the winner of the Portuguese Cup that same season.

The last two teams will be relegated to the Second Division and, from this, the first two teams will be promoted reciprocally. The LPFP reserves the right to reject participants if they do not meet the criteria set by the organization.

Participants

Throughout its history, the Portuguese First Division has had a total of 71 different participants, with only three having played in all editions since the opening: Sport Lisboa e Benfica, Sporting Clube de Portugal and Futebol Clube do Porto .

Season 2019-20

Portugal location map with islands.svg

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Poultry
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Belenenses SAD
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Benfica
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Boavista
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Braga
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Famalicão
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Gil Vicente
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Moreirense
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Father Ferreira
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Portimonense
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Porto
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Rio Ave
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Sporting CP
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Tondela
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V. Guimarães
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V. Setubal
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Sea Freight
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Casa Particular in Santa Clara
Location of equipment in the First League 2019-20
Equipment City Stadium Capacity Coach Brand Sponsored by
Belenenses Lisboa National Stadium 37.500 Flag of Portugal.svg Silas Flag of Portugal.svg Lacatoni Kia motors
Benfica Lisboa Estádio da Luz 66.500 Flag of Portugal.svg Bruno lage Flag of Germany.svg Adidas Emirates
Braga Braga Municipal Stadium of Braga 30.000 Flag of Portugal.svg Abel ferreira Flag of Portugal.svg Lacatoni Forum Braga
Boavista Port Bessa Stadium 28.263 Flag of Angola.svg Litho vidigal Flag of Portugal.svg Lacatoni Mestre da Cor
Sport of Birds Vila das Aves Clube Desportivo das Aves Stadium 5.441 Flag of Portugal.svg Augusto Inacio Flag of Portugal.svg Lacatoni MEO
Famalicão Townsville Municipal Stadium June 22 5.186 Flag of Portugal.svg Carlos Pinto Flag of Portugal.svg Lacatoni porminho
Gil Vicente Barcelos Cidade de Barcelos Stadium 12.504 Flag of Portugal.svg Vitor Oliveira Flag of Italy.svg Macron Agricultural Credit
Sea Freight Funchal Barreiros Stadium 10.600 Flag of Portugal.svg Jose Gomes Flag of the United States.svg Nike Betane
Moreirense Moreira de Canons Joaquim de Almeida Stadium 6.150 Flag of Portugal.svg Ivo Vieira Flag of Portugal.svg CDT
Investments Investments Mata Real Stadium 9.076 Flag of Portugal.svg Filipe rocha Flag of Portugal.svg Lacatoni Aldro
Portimonense Portimão Municipal Stadium of Portimão 5.870 Flag of Portugal.svg Antonio Folha Flag of Japan.svg Mizuno McDonald's
Porto Port Estádio do dragão 52.000 Flag of Portugal.svg Sergio Conceicao Flag of the United States.svg New Balance Altice
Rio Ave Vila do Conde Two Arches Stadium 9.065 Flag of Portugal.svg Daniel Ramos Flag of the United States.svg Nike MEO
Casa Particular in Santa Clara Ponta Delgada São Miguel Stadium 10 000 Flag of Portugal.svg Joao Henriques Flag of the United States.svg Nike Santander Totta
Sporting from Portugal Lisboa José Alvalade Stadium 52.000 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Marcel keizer Flag of Italy.svg Macron ONGOING
Tondela Tondela João Cardoso Stadium 5.000 Flag of Spain.svg Natxo Gonzalez Flag of Portugal.svg CDT Goat
Guimaraes victory Guimarães Dom Afonso Henriques Stadium 30.000 Flag of Portugal.svg Luís Castro Flag of Italy.svg Macron Castro Electronics
Vitoria de Setubal Setúbal Bonfim Stadium 15.497 Flag of Portugal.svg Sandro mendes Flag of Denmark.svg Bumblebee Kia motors

History

Despite the fact that 71 different teams have played in the First Division throughout its history, so far only five clubs have been able to win the tournament: Sport Lisboa and Benfica, 37 times; the Futebol Clube do Porto, at 28; Sporting Clube de Portugal, at 18; Club de Futebol Os Belenenses, in one; and Boavista Futebol Clube, in one.

All but two of the championships have been dominated by the so-called "big three": SL Benfica, FC Porto and Sporting CP. This hegemony is only surpassed in UEFA by the Scottish Premier League, where Celtic Football Club and Rangers Football Club have shared the last 30 titles.

Season Champion runner-up Third Notes
Experimental League
1934-35 FC Porto (1) Sporting CP SL Benfica Participation based on regional results. FC Porto is declared the first Portuguese champion.
1935-36 SL Benfica (1) FC Porto Sporting CP SL Benfica equals FC Porto in number of titles.
1936-37 SL Benfica (2) CF Os Belenenses Sporting CP SL Benfica surpasses FC Porto in number of titles.
1937-38 SL Benfica (3) FC Porto Sporting CP
National First Division Championship
1938-39 FC Porto (2) Sporting CP SL Benfica
1939-40 FC Porto (3) Sporting CP CF Os Belenenses League expanded to 10 teams. FC Porto equals SL Benfica in number of titles
1940-41 Sporting CP (1) FC Porto CF Os Belenenses League reduced to 8 teams.
1941-42 SL Benfica (4) Sporting CP CF Os Belenenses League expanded to 12 teams. SL Benfica surpasses FC Porto in number of titles
1942-43 SL Benfica (5) Sporting CP CF Os Belenenses League reduced to 10 teams.
1943-44 Sporting CP (2) SL Benfica Athletic CP
1944-45 SL Benfica (6) Sporting CP CF Os Belenenses
1945-46 CF Os Belenenses (1) SL Benfica Sporting CP League expanded to 12 teams. The promotion and relegation system is introduced.
1946-47 Sporting CP (3) SL Benfica FC Porto League expanded to 14 teams.
1947-48 Sporting CP (4) SL Benfica CF Os Belenenses
1948-49 Sporting CP (5) SL Benfica CF Os Belenenses
1949-50 SL Benfica (7) Sporting CP Athletic CP
1950-51 Sporting CP (6) SL Benfica SL Benfica
1951-52 Sporting CP (7) SL Benfica FC Porto SC Portugal equals SL Benfica in number of titles.
1952-53 Sporting CP (8) SL Benfica CF Os Belenenses Sporting CP surpasses SL Benfica in number of titles.
1953-54 Sporting CP (9) FC Porto SL Benfica
1954-55 SL Benfica (8) CF Os Belenenses Sporting CP
1955-56 FC Porto (4) SL Benfica CF Os Belenenses
1956-57 SL Benfica (9) FC Porto CF Os Belenenses SL Benfica equals Sporting CP in number of titles.
1957-58 Sporting CP (10) FC Porto SL Benfica SC Portugal surpasses SL Benfica in number of titles.
1958-59 FC Porto (5) SL Benfica CF Os Belenenses
1959-60 SL Benfica (10) Sporting CP CF Os Belenenses SL Benfica equals Sporting CP in number of titles.
1960-61 SL Benfica (11) Sporting CP FC Porto SL Benfica surpasses Sporting CP in number of titles.
1961-62 Sporting CP (11) FC Porto SL Benfica Sporting CP equals SL Benfica in number of titles.
1962-63 SL Benfica (12) FC Porto Sporting CP SL Benfica surpasses Sporting CP in number of titles.
1963-64 SL Benfica (13) FC Porto Sporting CP
1964-65 SL Benfica (14) FC Porto GD CUF do Barreiro Record of consecutive championships.
1965-66 Sporting CP (12) SL Benfica FC Porto
1966-67 SL Benfica (15) Academic of Coimbra FC Porto
1967-68 SL Benfica (16) Sporting CP FC Porto
1968-69 SL Benfica (17) FC Porto Guimaraes victory
1969-70 Sporting CP (13) SL Benfica Vitoria de Setubal
1970-71 SL Benfica (18) Sporting CP FC Porto
1971-72 SL Benfica (19) Vitoria de Setubal Sporting CP League expanded to 16 teams.
1972-73 SL Benfica (20) CF Os Belenenses Vitoria de Setubal Undefeated champion.
1973-74 Sporting CP (14) FC Porto Vitoria de Setubal Carnation Revolution. Madeira clubs can now be part of the league system.
1974-75 SL Benfica (21) FC Porto Sporting CP
1975-76 SL Benfica (22) Boavista FC CF Os Belenenses
1976-77 SL Benfica (23) Sporting CP FC Porto
1977-78 FC Porto (6) SL Benfica Sporting CP SL Benfica undefeated
1978-79 FC Porto (7) SL Benfica Sporting CP
1979-80 Sporting CP (15) FC Porto SL Benfica Azores clubs can now be part of the league system.
1980-81 SL Benfica (24) FC Porto Sporting CP
1981-82 Sporting CP (16) SL Benfica FC Porto
1982-83 SL Benfica (25) FC Porto Sporting CP
1983-84 SL Benfica (26) FC Porto Sporting CP
1984-85 FC Porto (8) Sporting CP SL Benfica
1985-86 FC Porto (9) SL Benfica Sporting CP
1986-87 SL Benfica (27) FC Porto Guimaraes victory
1987-88 FC Porto (10) SL Benfica CF Os Belenenses League expanded to 20 teams.
1988-89 SL Benfica (28) FC Porto Boavista FC
1989-90 FC Porto (11) SL Benfica Sporting CP League reduced to 18 teams.
1990-91 SL Benfica (29) FC Porto Sporting CP League expanded to 20 teams
1991-92 FC Porto (12) SL Benfica Boavista FC League reduced to 18 teams
1992-93 FC Porto (13) SL Benfica Sporting CP
1993-94 SL Benfica (30) FC Porto Sporting CP
1994-95 FC Porto (14) Sporting CP SL Benfica
1995-96 FC Porto (15) SL Benfica Sporting CP The LPFP succeeds the FPF as organizer. All three points are adopted for victory.
1996-97 FC Porto (16) Sporting CP SL Benfica FC Porto reaches Sporting CP in number of titles.
1997-98 FC Porto (17) SL Benfica Guimaraes victory FC Porto surpasses Sporting CP in number of titles.
1998-99 FC Porto (18) Boavista FC SL Benfica
first League
1999-00 Sporting CP (17) FC Porto SL Benfica
2000-01 Boavista FC (1) FC Porto Sporting CP
2001-02 Sporting CP (18) Boavista FC FC Porto Sporting CP reaches FC Porto in number of titles.
2002-03 FC Porto (19) SL Benfica Sporting CP FC Porto surpasses Sporting CP in number of titles.
2003-04 FC Porto (20) SL Benfica Sporting CP
2004-05 SL Benfica (31) FC Porto Sporting CP
2005-06 FC Porto (21) Sporting CP SL Benfica
2006-07 FC Porto (22) Sporting CP SL Benfica League reduced to 16 teams.
2007-08 FC Porto (23) Sporting CP Guimaraes victory Resolution of the "golden whistle" case.
2008-09 FC Porto (24) Sporting CP SL Benfica
2009-10 SL Benfica (32) SC Braga FC Porto
2010-11 FC Porto (25) SL Benfica Sporting CP Undefeated champion and greater advantage over the second.
2011-12 FC Porto (26) SL Benfica SC Braga
2012-13 FC Porto (27) SL Benfica FC Paços de Ferreira Undefeated champion
2013-14 SL Benfica (33) Sporting CP FC Porto
2014-15 SL Benfica (34) FC Porto Sporting CP
2015-16 SL Benfica (35) Sporting CP FC Porto Highest score of a champion.
2016-17 SL Benfica (36) FC Porto Sporting CP
2017-18 FC Porto (28) SL Benfica Sporting CP Highest scoring record tied.
2018-19 SL Benfica (37) FC Porto Sporting CP
2019-20 FC Porto (29) SL Benfica SC Braga

History

Club Champion runner-up Years of the championships
SL Benfica
37
29
1936, 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1950, 1955, 1957, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1994, 2005, 2010, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019
FC Porto
29
27
1935, 1939, 1940, 1956, 1959, 1978, 1979, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2018, 2020
Sporting CP
18
21
1941, 1944, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1980, 1982, 2000, 2002
Boavista FC
1
3
2001
CF Os Belenenses
1
3
1946
SC Braga
-
1

Vitória FC (Setúbal)
-
1

Academic of Coimbra
-
1

Statistics

Historical classification

The only three clubs that have been present in all editions of the competition are Sport Lisboa e Benfica, Sporting Clube de Portugal and Futebol Clube do Porto.

Note: Historical scoring system of 2 or 3 points per win. On Cursive teams without participation in the present edition.

Pos              Club Seasons Points PJ PG PE PP Securities
1 SL Benfica 82 5123 2296 1563 434 299 36
2 FC Porto 82 4968 2296 1516 420 363 27
3 Sporting from Portugal 82 4726 2296 1414 484 398 18
4 CF Os Belenenses 75 3082 2078 859 508 711 1
5 Guimaraes victory 71 2912 2086 804 500 782 0
6 SC Braga 60 2472 1820 677 441 702 0
7 Vitoria de Setubal 68 2449 1936 662 463 811 0
8 Boavista FC 53 2261 1602 620 401 581 1
9 Academic of Coimbra 64 1935 1704 516 387 801 0
10 CS Maritime 36 1525 1176 399 328 449 0


Statistics updated until the end of the season 2015-16.

Historic scorers table

For a complete detail see Top scorers of the Primeira Liga.

The all-time top scorer in the competition is the Portuguese Fernando Peyroteo with 332 goals, all of them wearing the Sporting Clube de Portugal jersey, and an average of 1.68 goals per game that make him one of the most prolific strikers in history. Behind is Eusébio da Silva, with 319 goals (1.02 on average) and Fernando Gomes, with 318 goals.

If the records of a single season were taken into account, the scoring record corresponds to Argentine Héctor Yazalde, with 46 goals in the 1973/74 season.

The newspaper The ball awards the Silver Ball to the top scorer. The player who has conquered him the most times has been Eusébio, a total of 7 times, followed by Peyroteo and Gomes (6 times), José Águas and Mário Jardel (5 times).

It is also worth highlighting the aforementioned Peyroteo, Gomes and Eusébio, who are three of the players who have scored the most goals in the highest categories of European football, with 332, 330 and 320 goals respectively, being the Portuguese best positioned in the record after Cristiano Ronaldo, who only scored three goals in Portugal.

Note: Matches and goals counted according to official records. On bold font, active footballers.

Pos Player G. Go. avg Debut Debut team Other clubs
1 Flag of Portugal.svg Fernando Peyroteo 332 197 1.69 1937/38 Sporting CP (332)
2 Flag of Portugal.svg Eusebio da Silva 320 313 1.02 1960/61 SL Benfica (317) SC Beira-Mar (3)
3 Flag of Portugal.svg Fernando Gomes 318 404 0.79 1972/73 FC Porto (287) Sporting CP (31)
4 Flag of Portugal.svg Jose Águas 291 281 1.04 1950/51 SL Benfica (291)
5 Flag of Portugal.svg Manuel Tamagnini Baby 260 421 0.62 1968/69 SL Benfica (260)
6 Flag of Portugal.svg Manuel Jose Tavares Fernandes 241 485 0.50 1969/70 GD CUF Barreiro (34) Sporting CP (191), Vitoria de Setubal (16)
7 Flag of Portugal.svg Sebastian Fonseca Matateu 219 291 0.75 1951/52 CF Os Belenenses (282) Atletico Clube de Portugal (9)
8 Flag of Portugal.svg José Torres 217 374 0.58 1959/60 SL Benfica (151) Vitória de Setúbal (52), GD Estoril Praia (14)
9 Flag of Portugal.svg Arsenio Trindade Duarte 214 313 0.68 1943/44 SL Benfica (154) GD CUF Barreiro (60)
10 Flag of Portugal.svg Rui Jordão 212 375 0.57 1971/72 SL Benfica (63) Sporting CP (137), Vitória de Setúbal (12)

Statistics updated until 22 January 2017.

Players with the most matches

The player who has played the most games in the Portuguese First Division is the striker Manuel Jose Tavares Fernandes, with a total of 485 meetings between the three teams in which he played in the top flight for 19 seasons. With just one less is the midfielder António Augusto Gomes de Sousa, with up to 484 games between four clubs, and the striker João Pinto, with 476 calls. The fourth place is occupied by Dinis Vital, the first goalkeeper on the list, with 449 games between Lusitano GC and Vitória de Setúbal during 18 seasons. Only 13 footballers, all of them Portuguese, have exceeded 400 matches in the competition.

The foreigner who has played the most times in first League he is the brazilian defender Luiz Carlos Filgueira; from 1988 to 2004 he added a total of 398 matches in the elite. He is closely followed by his compatriot Alan, who is also the active player with the most games played, 389 in total.

Note: In bold font active footballers in the category during the 2016-17 campaign.

Pos Player Go. Tit. temp Debut team Other clubs
1 Flag of Portugal.svg Manuel Jose Tavares Fernandes 485 (473) 1969 - 1988 (19) GD CUF Barreiro Sporting CP, Vitória de Setúbal
2 Flag of Portugal.svg Antonio Augusto Gomes de Sousa 484 (449) 1975 - 1994 (18) Sporting CP FC Porto, SC Beira-Mar, Gil Vicente FC
3 Flag of Portugal.svg Joao Pinto 476 (439) 1988 - 2008 (19) Boavista FC SL Benfica, Sporting CP, SC Braga
4 Flag of Portugal.svg Dinis Vital 442 (441) 1980 - 1997 (17) Lusitano GC Vitoria de Setubal
5 Flag of Portugal.svg Antonio Veloso 437 (410) 1978 - 1995 (18) SL Benfica
6 Flag of Portugal.svg Manuel Bento 422 (417) 1967 - 1992 (24) FC Barreirense SL Benfica
7 Flag of Portugal.svg Baby 422 (380) 1968 - 1986 (18) SL Benfica
8 Flag of Portugal.svg Vítor Ladies 416 (416) 1966 - 1989 (19) Guimaraes victory Portimonense SC, Sporting CP
9 Flag of Portugal.svg Joao Domingos da Silva Pinto 408 (404) 1980 - 1997 (17) FC Porto
10 Flag of Portugal.svg Vítor Baía 406 (404) 1987 - 2007 (18) FC Porto

Statistics updated until end of season 2016-17.
Joao Vieira Pinto at Exponor 2011

João Pinto is the third footballer with the most matches in first League.

Transfers

On August 2, 2020, Benfica made the most expensive signing in its history and in the history of the Portuguese First Division, managing to sign Uruguayan striker Darwin Núñez from UD Almería for 24 million euros.

Other competitions

  • Portugal Cup
  • Portuguese Super Cup
  • Portuguese League Cup

See also

  • Flag shirt of Europe.svg Portal: Soccer in Europe. .
  • Portugal soccer team
  • Annex: Portugal football stadiums

Outlinks

  • Official website of the Professional Football League of Portugal (in Portuguese)