Premier League

Premier League

Premier League
Soccerball current event.svg CXXI Edition (2020-21)
Premier league text logo
General data
Venue

Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom

(Flag of England.svg England)

Association Flag of Europe.svg UEFA
Zone First category
Opening August 15st, 1992
No. of editions 26
Organized by The Football Association
(The FA)
Sponsored by
Official TV
History
Champion County Flag of Merseyside.svg Liverpool FC (1 title)
runner-up Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC
Third Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC
Statistical data
Participants 20 equipment
Matches 380 (10 for 38 days)
Most laureate Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC (13 titles)
More presences
Decline EFL Championship
Classification a UEFA 2013 UEFA Champions League
Logo uefa europe 2012 UEFA Europa League
UEFA Conference League
Chronology
Football League First Division (1888–1992) Premier League
(1992-Act.)
-
Official site

La Premier League (in Spanish, Major League), also known in England as Premiership, is the highest category of the football league system in England. It began to be played in the 1992-93 season, only being interrupted in the 2019-20 season by the coronavirus pandemic. For historical reasons, those Welsh clubs that so wish may also participate in it, provided that they have competed continuously in the English federated football system since at least June 30, 1992. This is the case of Swansea City Association Football Club, a club based in Wales that participates in the league and has come to represent England in European competitions.

Established the First Division of England known as The Football League in 1888 under the protection of The Football Association, became the "first soccer league in the world." It was merged in 1892 with the Football Alliance to form the first division system, and the main category was renamed as Football League First Division. This system was expanded until there was a split in the competition, becoming the Football League —Which currently makes up three divisions— Premier League its main exponent, while the joint First Division of England and Wales of the Football League it became second in importance.

The current format was established after an agreement on February 20, 1992 between the clubs of the First Division for which they decided to separate from the Football League to take advantage of a lucrative television rights contract they promoted. It is therefore a competition of a private nature or society in which the twenty member clubs act as shareholders through a person delegated by each representative, who govern said committee together with Dave Richards, its director, and Richard Scudamore, its executive director. .

The Premier League is considered one of the five major European leagues together with the Spanish First Division, the Italian Serie A, the German Bundesliga and the Ligue 1 France, occupying the first place of the UEFA coefficient, according to the International Federation of Football History and Statistics (IFFHS), it is the "most relevant league in the world". The tournament was considered by the IFFHS of FIFA as the strongest league of the first decade of the century XXI in Europe, surpassing the First Division of Spain and Serie A of Italy that occupied the second and third place respectively.

From its second edition and until the 2015-16 season, the name of the main sponsor was reflected in its official name, being the last since 2004 when it was known as Barclays Premier League, a circumstance that ceased to be the case as of the 2016-17 season, when any allusion to sponsors disappeared in order to maintain a clean commercial image. Since then it has been known simply as Premier League.

Throughout its history seven clubs have been champions, with Manchester United being the most successful team with thirteen championships. Chelsea, Arsenal, Manchester City, Blackburn Rovers, Leicester City and Liverpool complete the rest of the titles of the twenty-eight seasons of the championship. .

After the 2003-04 season, Arsenal acquired the nickname "The Invincibles" as they became, and still remain, the only club to complete a Premier League campaign without losing a single game.

The highest number of points in an edition, with one hundred, was achieved in the 2017-18 season by Manchester City FC, also achieving the record for goals in an edition with 106 in the same season.

In 2020, after the 2019-20 Premier League season, Liverpool FC would be crowned Premier League champions, achieving after almost 30 years of drought, its 19th trophy and the first since the English league was renamed Premier League. .F.

Our Story

Origins and background

Original laws of the game 1863

First rules of soccer.

The Football Association (FA) established the starting point with the drafting of the first thirteen guidelines for both the practice and the correct development of association football. Under these rules the first official competition in history was founded, the Football Association Challenge Cup —Still in force today— and that was the reference tournament worldwide.

Thus it lasted until 1880, the date on which professionalism was accepted in the football and what motivated big clubs lovers lost prominence and were relegated, leading eight years later in what was the first English professional league championship, the Football League.

THE FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION AND THE FIRST RULES (Association football and the first rules)

  1. “The maximum length of the field must be 200 yards, the maximum width must be 100 yards, the length and width must be delimited with flags; and the goal will be defined by two vertical posts, separated by eight yards, without any tape or bar between them.
  2. A toss for the goals shall be carried out, and the game shall begin with a stopped ball kick from the center of the field by the side that lost the toss for the goals; the other side must not come within 10 yards of the ball until it has been thrown out.
  3. After a goal is scored, the losing side should have the right to serve, and the two sides should switch goals after each goal is scored.
  4. A goal must be scored when the ball passes between the goal posts or over the space between the goal posts (at any height), without having been thrown, hit or transported.
  5. When the ball is out of bounds, the first player to touch it must throw it from the point on the boundary line where it left the field in a direction at right angles to the boundary line, and the ball must not be in play until has touched the ground.
  6. When a player has kicked the ball, whichever side is closer to the opponent's goal line is out of play, and may not touch the ball, or in any way prevent another player from doing so, until he is at stake; but neither player is offside when the ball is thrown from behind the goal line.
  7. In case the ball goes behind the goal line, if a player on the side to which the goal belongs touches the ball first, one on his side must be entitled to a free kick from the goal line at the point opposite the place in which the ball must (sic) be touched. If a player on the opposite side touches the ball first, one on his side shall be entitled to a free throw on goal only from a point 15 yards from the goal line, opposite to where the ball is touched, with the side opponent at the finish line until you have made your shot.
  8. If a player makes an air catch ("fair catch"), he must be entitled to a free throw, showing that he is claiming it by simultaneously marking with the cue; and to take that shot he may go back as far as he wishes, and no player on the opposite side shall advance beyond the mark until he has kicked.
  9. No player shall run with the ball.
  10. No tripping or kicking should be allowed, and no player should use his hands to hold or push his opponent.
  11. A player must not be allowed to throw the ball or pass it to another with his hands.
  12. No player shall be allowed to take the ball off the ground with his hands under any excuse while it is in play.
  13. No player shall be allowed to use protruding nails, iron plates or gutta-percha (solid rubber reinforcement) on the soles of their boots. ”
TheFootballAssociation. 1863.

It had a great growth in the British Isles, and soon began to expand to other parts of Europe. Adopting the same rules and guidelines in these areas was the benchmark football in which all the clubs that were emerging were set and which in turn made up their own competitions and leagues. The English, much longer and established, began to forge large clubs by increasing their competitiveness, so a first restructuring of the championship was necessary to accommodate more clubs. It was thus established after merging with the Football Alliance —League that emerged in 1889 between the clubs in the center and north-west of England — and form the First and Second Division (in English, First Division and Second Division). Thus it endured as the highest category of a league system that expanded over the next hundred years. In it, a total of twenty-three different clubs were proclaimed champions, with Liverpool Football Club being the most awarded with eighteen titles, followed by ten from Arsenal Football Club and nine from Everton Football Club.

Context prior to desertion

Although England had been the reference in its origins, it began to change a sporting course that led to a desertion of the most important clubs in England from the First Division. By contrast, European football had been through good times in the 1970s and 1980s, while British football was at a critical juncture in the late 1980s. The stadiums were in poor condition, the hooligans they caused riots at matches and began to grow in numbers, and FA teams were unable to play in European competitions after the Heysel tragedy in 1985, where 39 fans were killed.

The First Division, once a reference, was far from the level reached by leagues such as Serie A in Italy or the First Division in Spain in terms of assistance and income, while a considerable number of English players had emigrated to other countries. In need of a new large-scale restructuring, the downward trend began to gradually reverse after the semi-finals reached by the England team at the 1990 World Cup. UEFA, the governing body of European football, lifted the ban on English teams from playing in European competitions, and the following year Manchester United Football Club won the Champions Club Cup popularly known as the Recopa de Europa. In addition, the Taylor Report on safety standards that stadiums should have, which proposed that all stadiums allocate a significant budget with which to buy seats for all spectators after the Hillsborough tragedy, was published in January of that. year giving new air to English football.

The subject of television economic income began to be approached with interest; the Football League had received just £ 6,3 million for a two-year deal in 1986, but when the deal ended in 1988, the price rose to £ 44 million over a four-year period. The 1988 negotiations were the first sign of a division between the clubs; ten of them threatened to leave the league and form a "super league," although in the end they were persuaded not to carry out their intentions. Country teams again considered leaving the Football League to capitalize on the growing influence of money generated by sports activities.

La Premier League

Foundation and early years

At the end of the 1990-91 season, some of the most influential clubs proposed to establish a new league with which more income would be generated. The agreement between the later founding members was signed on July 17, 1991 and established the basic principles to create the Football Association Premier LeagueThe defection would have commercial independence from the English Federation and the Football League, giving the Premier League the license to negotiate its own broadcasting and sponsorship deals. The excuse given at the time was that the additional revenue would allow English clubs to compete with other European teams.

In 1992 all the teams of the First Division they gave up the Football League and on May 27, 1992, the new competition was formed in the form of a limited company not dependent on the Federation, but based in its facilities at the time, in Lancaster Gate, thus counting on its protection and recognition. This meant the end 104 years old in which the Football League 'had until then operated with four divisions; since then the Premier League functioned as a single division, the first, and the Football League with the remaining three. It was the most notable change, since it was maintained with the same format that governed the old divisions and with the same promotion system.

Its first season was therefore the 1992-93 campaign and was originally composed of the 22 dissident clubs. These inaugural members of the new league were: Arsenal Football Club, Aston Villa Football Club, Chelsea Football Club, Coventry City Football Club, Crystal Palace Football Club, Everton Football Club, Liverpool Football Club, Manchester City Football Club, Manchester United Football Club, Nottingham Forest Football Club, Leeds United Association Football Club, Oldham Athletic Association Football Club, Queens Park Rangers Football Club, Sheffield United Football Club, Norwich City Football Club, Sheffield Wednesday Football Club, Southampton Football Club, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, Wimbledon Football Club, and the three promoted Ipswich Town Football Club, Middlesbrough Football Club and Blackburn Rovers Football Club. Luton Town Football Club, Notts County Football Club and West Ham United Football Club were the three relegated teams from the former First Division at the end of the 1991-92 season, so they did not participate in this inaugural season.

The first goal in the history of the league was scored by Brian Deane, of Sheffield United Football Club, in a match won by his squad 2-1 against Manchester United Football Club, who was proclaimed winner of this first edition, adding his title number eight as English champion and position as the fourth most successful club in the league competition It was one of the games that opened the competition on August 15. Another novelty was to try to distribute the matches as much as possible in the calendar, attending to the needs of the clubs, as long as it was approved by its members, reciprocally favoring the competition and the market.

While not nearly plausible, there was an increase in scoring records as well as stadium goers. The latter came due to the aforementioned Taylor Report prepared by the government in which all seats had to be seats, causing after the consequent loss of capacity that many clubs remodeled their stadiums to give them greater capacity. The measure, however, contracted contraventions such as the increase in the price of the tickets or the request for loans to undertake said works, which were nevertheless corrected due to the economic emoluments for the sponsorships and audiovisual agreements.

It should be noted that from this first edition, the lucrative distribution was distributed more evenly among the participants, allowing the greatest equality between all to exist as far as possible. A circumstance that remained and is currently one of the main reasons why it is considered one of the most competitive and disputed leagues in the world. Despite this, one of the most benefited from the new tournament was Manchester United FC , club that was proclaimed champion in four of the first five editions. Something remarkable since before winning the 1993 title it had not won the league championship for twenty-six years, and it became the second club in England in terms of record, behind Liverpool FC, historical dominator. Curiously, it was the opposite case, being the club most affected, since since the Premier League The Merseyside club was not able to become champion until the 2019-20 season, but the success of the "Red Devils" was supported by its members, who ended up being historic for both the club and the competition. Led by Alex Ferguson, Éric Cantona, Mark Hughes, Peter Schmeichel and Ryan Giggs, they made the club the English benchmark.

Among the exceptions was the Blackburn Rovers Football Club, who, thanks to the scoring contribution of its greatest exponent, Alan Shearer, was proclaimed the winner in the 1994-95 season, breaking the supremacy of those from Manchester. The player, a native of Newcastle, ended up signing for his hometown club Newcastle United Football Club after failing to repeat the league success the following season and being one of the stars of the league under a record transfer.

The formula opened the championship a lot, with a total of eight different teams that at one time reached the top three positions in those first five years. It was the characteristic sign of the championship before it was slowed down by the economy accumulated by some clubs that made it especially since the 1999-00 season dominated by the so-called "Big Four".

Fight against him "Big Four"

temp Arsenal FC Chelsea fc Liverpool FC Man. United FC
Positions of the "Big Four" during the 2000s
1999-00 2.º Partners must 5.º Partners must 4.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
2000-01 2.º Partners must 6.º Partners must 3.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
2001-02 1.º Partners must 6.º Partners must 2.º Partners must 3.º Partners must
2002-03 2.º Partners must 4.º Partners must 5.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
2003-04 1.º Partners must 2.º Partners must 4.º Partners must 3.º Partners must
2004-05 2.º Partners must 1.º Partners must 5.º Partners must 3.º Partners must
2005-06 4.º Partners must 1.º Partners must 3.º Partners must 2.º Partners must
2006-07 4.º Partners must 2.º Partners must 3.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
2007-08 3.º Partners must 2.º Partners must 4.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
2008-09 4.º Partners must 3.º Partners must 2.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
2009-10 3.º Partners must 1.º Partners must 7.º Partners must 2.º Partners must
2010-11 4.º Partners must 2 º 6.º Partners must 1.º Partners must
Times between
first four
12 9 8 12

The circumstance of the competition in the mid-2000s of the dominance of the clubs that made up the so-called "Big Four" —Whose clubs were Arsenal Football Club, Chelsea Football Club, Liverpool Football Club and Manchester United Football Club—, added a new but relative interest, since despite the fact that the rivalry between the aforementioned large clubs was extolled, the competitiveness with the rest of the league members During this decade, and particularly from 2002 to 2009, these clubs occupied the first four places in the ranking, obtaining the accesses to the UEFA Champions League that brought them even greater benefits. . In May 2008, Kevin Keegan - then coach of Newcastle United Football Club - claimed that this dominance could pose a threat to the league at the risk of becoming one of the most boring, but one of the largest in the world.

The competition's executive director, Richard Scudamore, defended the situation by stating that there were different disputes in the tournament, depending on whether a club is at the top, the middle or the bottom, which continued to make the competition interesting. In the following years, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club and Manchester City Football Club tried not only to be among the top four, but to consolidate themselves as two other clubs to consider, a circumstance that they achieved in the first instance. were the first club outside the quartet to finish in the top four since Everton Football Club did so in 2010. However, despite new clubs being added to the final fight for the title, criticism among public opinion was they noted due to the large point gap between the then select group of so-called "super-clubs" and the rest of the teams. The registrations worsened the situation by giving them a greater capacity to invest in transfers compared to the rest, which allowed them to form more competitive squads.

At the same time, there was the entry of large foreign investors, who by buying the shares of different clubs caused the entry of new sums that threatened all competitiveness. Due to this, UEFA, foreseeing an increasingly integrated situation in English football but which also extended to the rest of Europe, implemented the regulations of the Fair Play Financial. An economic measure of economic restrictions to be met by all affiliated clubs to prevent those with greater purchasing power from making their already manifest superiorities insurmountable. One of these clubs benefiting from the entry of foreign capital was Manchester City Football Club, which in the 2011-12 season became the second club outside the "Big Four" to win the league - after Blackburn Rovers Football Club did so in the long-ago 1994-95 season. On the contrary, three of the clubs of the aforementioned quartet, Chelsea FC and Liverpool FC and Manchester United FC finished in the first years of the 2010s outside the first four positions, being the small exceptions to the future of the competition, which it is still trying to return to a more global competitiveness.

The titles continued to fall on the side of the big clubs until the so-called "Miracle of Leicester" occurred against all odds in the 2015-16 season. Without having been a regular in the category - having risen just two years earlier and achieving a miraculous salvation shortly after the 2014-15 season - there was nothing to predict that Leicester City Football Club would be proclaimed the winner. It was also the first time in its history that it achieved the league title, becoming the sixth champion club of the Premier League.

Participants

Format

At the end of the 2011-12 season, there have been 20 full Premier League seasons. At the insistence of FIFA, the international governing body for soccer, that regional leagues should reduce the number of clubs participating in them, the number of participants dropped to 20 in 1995 after four teams were relegated against promotion. of only two. On June 8, 2006, FIFA asked all major European leagues, including Italy's Serie A and the Spanish league, to be reduced to 18 teams for the 2007-08 season. Despite this, the Premier League expressed its disagreement with carrying out another reduction in the number of participants, in the end, in the 2007-08 season, 20 teams participated. In 2007, the league changed its name from “FA Premier League” to simply “Premier League.” Welsh club Swansea City were promoted to the Premier League in the 2011-12 season, becoming the first non-English team to compete in this league. Swansea City and Wigan Athletic were played in the first league match outside of England on 20 August 2011 at Liberty Stadium located in Swansea, Wales. A second team from Wales (Cardiff City) was promoted in the 2013 season. 14, but dropped at the end of that season.

2020–21 season

Team City Coach Captain Stadium Capacity
Arsenal Flag of Greater London.svg London Flag of Spain.svg Mikel Arteta Flag of Gabon.svg Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang Emirates Stadium 60 260
Aston Villa Flag of the West Midlands County.svg Birmingham Flag of England.svg Dean Smith Flag of England.svg Jack Grealish Villa park 42 790
Brighton & Hove Albion Flag of East Sussex.svg Brighton & Hove Flag of England.svg Graham potter Flag of England.svg Lewis Dunk The Amex Stadium 30 666
Burnley Flag of Lancashire.svg Burnley Flag of England.svg Sean Dyche Flag of England.svg Tom heaton Turf Moor 21 944
Chelsea Flag of Greater London.svg London Flag of Germany.svg Thomas Tuchel Flag of Spain.svg Cesar Azpilicueta Stamford Bridge 41 631
Crystal Palace Flag of Greater London.svg London Flag of England.svg Roy Hodgson Flag of Serbia.svg Luka Milivojevic Selhurst Park 26 047
Everton County Flag of Merseyside.svg Liverpool Flag of Italy.svg Carlo Ancelotti Flag of England.svg Phil Jagielka Goodison Park 39 221
Fulham Flag of Greater London.svg London Flag of England.svg Scott Parker Flag of Scotland.svg Tom cairney Craven Cottage 25 700
Leeds United Coat of arms of West Yorkshire County Council Leeds Flag of Argentina.svg Marcelo bielsa Flag of Scotland.svg Liam cooper Elland Road 40 242
Leicester City County Flag of Leicestershire Leicester Ulster Banner.svg Brendan rodgers Flag of Jamaica.svg Wes Morgan King Power Stadium 32 312
Liverpool County Flag of Merseyside.svg Liverpool Flag of Germany.svg Jurgen Klopp Flag of England.svg Jordan Henderson Anfield 54 074
Manchester City Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester Flag of Spain.svg Pep Guardiola Flag of Belgium civil.svg Kevin de Bruyne Etihad Stadium 55 017
Manchester United Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester Flag of Norway.svg Ole Gunnar Solskjær Flag of England.svg Harry Maguire Old Trafford 74 994
Newcastle United County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle Flag of England.svg Steve Bruce Flag of England.svg Jamaal lascelles St James' Park 52 354
Sheffield United Coat of arms of South Yorkshire County Council Sheffield Flag of England.svg Chris Wilder Flag of England.svg Billy Sharp Bramall lane 32 702
Southampton Flag of Hampshire.svg Southampton Flag of Austria.svg Ralph Hasenhüttl Flag of England.svg James Ward-Prowse St Mary's Stadium 32 384
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of Greater London.svg London Flag of Portugal.svg Jose Mourinho Flag of France.svg Hugo Lloris Tottenham Hotspur Stadium 62 062
West Bromwich Albion FlagOfHertfordshire West Bromwich Flag of Croatia.svg Slaven Bilić Flag of England.svg Jake livermore The Hawthorns 26 287
West Ham United Flag of Greater London.svg London Flag of Scotland.svg David moyes Flag of England.svg Mark Noble London stadium 60 000
Wolverhampton Wanderers Flag of the West Midlands County.svg Wolverhampton Flag of Portugal.svg Nuno Espirito Santo Flag of England.svg Conor Coady Molineux Stadium 32 050
Data updated as of September 7, 2020

After the relegation to the Second Division of Aston Villa Football Club, the 2015-16 season was reduced to six teams that have played all editions of the Premier League since its establishment in 1992.

For the 2017-18 edition, Huddersfield Town Football Club and Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club made their debut in the competition, marking the fifth time in their history in the top flight of English football for Brightonians.

In the global count of all the historical editions of the First Division, Everton Football Club adds with this its 116th participation, being the club that has played the highest category the most times. The contenders are followed by 104 appearances by Liverpool Football Club and 102 by Arsenal Football Club.

Corporate structure

The Premier League operates as a company and is owned by the 20 clubs that comprise it. Each club is a shareholder, and therefore each one has a vote in questions related to changes in the regulations as well as in the contracts. The clubs elect a president, director and board of directors who together oversee the day-to-day operations of the league.The current president is Sir Dave Richards, elected in April 1999, while the director is Richard Scudamore. , who took office in November of that year. Previous chairman and CEO John Quinton and Peter Leaver were forced to resign in March 1999 after awarding consulting contracts to former Sky executives Sam Chisholm and David Chance The Football Association is not directly involved in the day-to-day operations of the league, although it does have veto power by being a special shareholder during president and secretary elections as well as at times when new rules are adopted.

The Premier League sends representatives to the UEFA European Club Association; the number of clubs and the clubs themselves are chosen according to UEFA coefficients. For the 2010-11 season, the Premier League had ten representatives in the Association. The Association of European Clubs is in turn the body responsible for electing three members to serve on the UEFA Club Competitions Committee. which participates in the operations of UEFA competitions such as the Champions League and the European League.

Competition system

Managed and controlled by the Football Association of England, there are 20 teams in the Premier League. During each season (from August to May) each team faces each other twice (a double system of all against all), once in their stadium and once in that of their opponents, for a total of 38 games for each team . The distribution of points is simple: 3 for the team that wins a game, 1 for each team if they tie and no points for the team that loses. The teams are classified according to the score obtained, in addition to the goal difference, and the goals scored. At the end of each season, the club with the most points is the league champion. In the event that two or more clubs obtain the same score, the difference in goals as well as the goals in favor determine the winner. If even after this the winner could not be chosen, those teams would be declared Premier League champions. If there is a tie for relegation or qualification for other competitions, a match is held play off in a neutral venue to decide the final classification. The last three teams in the classification are relegated to the Football League Championship and are replaced by the best two of the Football League Championship, together with the winner of a system of play off which is played between the third, fourth, fifth and sixth positions of that same division.

Qualification for European competitions

Arsenal vs. Borussia Dortmund

Arsenal Football Club match in the Champions League (2011).

Following changes to the qualifying system in the 2009-10 Champions League season, the top four places in the Premier League qualify for the UEFA Champions League (the top three enter the group stage directly and the fourth to the fourth qualifying round where he must win a double elimination to enter the group stage). Previously, only the top two places qualified automatically, while the fifth place qualifies for the UEFA Europa League group stage. The sixth and seventh can also qualify, depending on what happens in the two cup competitions, the FA cup and the League Cup. If the FA Cup champion finishes in the top five, the UEFA Cup berth would go to sixth place in the Premier League. If the League Cup is won by a team that has already qualified for a European competition, the place of the winner of the League Cup goes to the highest ranked team that has not qualified for Europe. In addition, one more seat for the UEFA Europa League is available through the initiative of fair play from UEFA. If the Premier League has one of the three rankings de fair play highest in Europe, the highest ranked team in that ranking (who have not already qualified) are automatically qualified for the first qualifying round of the UEFA Europa League.

An exception to the traditional qualification system for Europe occurred in 2005 after Liverpool had won the Champions League a year earlier, but did not finish in a Champions League spot in the Premier League. Therefore, UEFA allowed Liverpool to participate in the Champions League, with England having five teams qualified during that season. UEFA eventually established that the reigning champions would automatically qualify for the Champions League the following year regardless of their position. in the Premier League. However, for those leagues that have four Champions League qualifications, this means that if the Champions League winner fails to be in the Champions League place, they will then qualify at the expense of fourth place in the league. It should be noted that no association can have more than four places in each Champions League.

In 2007, the Premier League became the top-ranked European league based on the performance of English teams in European competitions over a five-year period. This marked the end of an eight-year era dominated by the Spanish league, with the top three leagues in Europe allowed to qualify four of their teams for the Champions League. Michel Platini, the president of UEFA, had proposed that one of the places corresponding to the three best leagues be for the winners of the national cup. However, his proposal was rejected in a vote cast during a meeting of the UEFA Strategy Council. At that same meeting it was agreed that the third team in the four best leagues would automatically qualify for the group stage of the Champions League, instead of enter the third round of qualifications, while fourth place would enter the round of play off, thereby guaranteeing an opponent from one of the fifteen best European leagues. The latter was part of Platini's original proposal consisting of increasing the number of teams that qualified directly for the group stage, in addition to simultaneously increasing the number of clubs from associations with fewer ranking in the group stage.

Trofeo

Trophy Premier League 13-14

Premier League trophy.

Royal Jewelers Garrard & Co | Asprey of London created the current Premier League trophy. This weighs 4 stones (25 kg), has a height of 30 inches (76 cm), a width of 17 inches (43 cm) and a depth of 9,8 inches (25 cm). Its main body is made of genuine silver. and gilt silver, while its pedestal is made of malachite, a semi-precious stone. The pedestal has a silver stripe around its circumference, on which are written the names of the clubs that have won the league since its appearance in 1992. The green color of malachite is also to symbolize the playing field of each stadium. where the matches are played The trophy design is inspired by the heraldry of the Three Lions which is associated with English football. Two of the lions are on each of the upper sides of the trophy, while the third is symbolized by the captain of the champion team when he lifts the cup. The golden crown serves to crown the new champion at the end of each season.In 2004, a special gold version of the trophy was created to commemorate the season Arsenal won the title without being defeated in a single game.

History

For a better detail of each edition and its historical champions see History of the First Division of England
For the counterpart competition above see Football League First Division.

Although 49 different teams have played in the Premier League throughout its history, so far only seven clubs have been able to win the tournament: Manchester United Football Club, thirteen times; Chelsea Football Club, in five; Manchester City Football Club, in four; Arsenal Football Club, in three; and Blackburn Rovers Football Club, Leicester City Football Club and Liverpool Football Club on one occasion.

Even so, in the last 25 seasons (1994-1995), two teams have monopolized the championships 16 times (Manchester United Football Club and Chelsea Football Club), however in recent years this hegemony of two clubs has been surpassed by other major leagues. Europeans in the last 25 seasons, including: Serie A (Italy), where Juventus FC and FC Internazionale have won 18 titles out of 25; The First Division of Spain, where Real Madrid Club de Fútbol and Fútbol Club Barcelona have won 20 titles out of 25; The Eredivisie, where PSV and AFC Ajax have shared 21 of 25 titles; The Bundesliga, where FC Bayern and Borussia Dortmund have divided 21 of 25 seasons; The Portuguese Football League, where the Sport Lisboa e Benfica and Futebol Clube do Porto teams have been champions in 22 of the last 25 years and the Scottish Premier League, where Celtic Football Club and Rangers Football Club have shared the 25 last titles. Other leagues that also have a high hegemony of two clubs such as: the Greek Super League, the Ukrainian Premier League or the Belgian First Division.

Note: Names and flags of the teams according to the time.

Season Champion runner-up Third Notes
Football Association Premier League
1992-93 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of the West Midlands County.svg Aston Villa FC County Flag of Norfolk Norwich City FC First championship after the split
Football Association Carling Premiership
1993-94 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Lancashire Blackburn Rovers FC County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC Double champion
1994-95 Flag of Lancashire Blackburn Rovers FC (1) Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC County Flag of Nottinghamshire.svg Nottingham Forest FC
1995-96 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Double champion. League reduced to 20 teams
1996-97 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC
1997-98 Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Double champion
1998-99 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Triple Champion
1999-00 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Unofficial County Flag of West Yorkshire Leeds United FC
2000-01 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Consecutive championship record
Football Association Barclaycard Premiership
2001-02 Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Double champion
2002-03 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC
2003-04 Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC (3) Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Undefeated champion
Football Association Barclays Premiership
2004-05 Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Double champion, champion with fewer goals against.
2005-06 Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC
2006-07 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC
Barclays Premier League
2007-08 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Double champion
2008-09 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Double champion. Consecutive championship record equaled
2009-10 Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Double champion.
2010-11 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC
2011-12 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC
2012-13 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC (13) Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc
2013-14 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Double champion
2014-15 Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Double champion
2015-16 County Flag of Leicestershire Leicester City FC (1) Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC Flag of Greater London.svg Tottenham Hotspur FC Champion after 132 years of existence
Premier League
2016-17 Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc (5) Flag of Greater London.svg Tottenham Hotspur FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC
2017-18 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Flag of Greater London.svg Tottenham Hotspur FC Double champion. Higher score, victories, goals, goal average and advantage over the second of a champion.
2018-19 Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC (4) County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc Champion of the national triplet. Matching champion win record.
2019-20 County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC (1) Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC Fastest champion. Matching champion win record.
2020-21 Ongoing

History

For the historical record of the First Division see Historical record of the English First Division.

Note: Names and flags of the teams according to the time.

Club Securities Subtitles Third Years Champion
Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC
13
6
4
1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013
Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc
5
4
5
2005, 2006, 2010, 2015, 2017
Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC
4
3
2
2012, 2014, 2018, 2019
Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC
3
6
5
1998, 2002, 2004
County Flag of Merseyside Liverpool FC
1
4
5
2020
Flag of Lancashire Blackburn Rovers FC
1
1
-
1995
County Flag of Leicestershire Leicester City FC
1
-
-
2016
County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC
-
2
2
Flag of Greater London.svg Tottenham Hotspur FC
-
1
2
Flag of the West Midlands County.svg Aston Villa FC
-
1
-
Unofficial County Flag of West Yorkshire Leeds United AFC
-
-
1
County Flag of Norfolk Norwich City FC
-
-
1
County Flag of Nottinghamshire.svg Nottingham Forest FC
-
-
1

Statistics

For a complete statistical summary of the competition see Premier League Statistics
  • Dimitar Berbatov is the first foreign player to score 5 goals in a single match in Manchester United's 7-1 win over Blackburn Rovers on 27 November 2010.
  • Fernando Torres is the Premier League debutant with the most goals in the history of the competition, having scored 28 goals in his first season with Liverpool (2007-08), thus surpassing Ruud van Nistelrooy who scored 23 goals for Manchester United in its first season.
  • On 10 February 2013, Manchester United player Ryan Giggs became the only player to have scored at least one goal in each of the first 21 editions of the Premier League.
  • Manchester United player Ryan Giggs is the only player to participate in the first 21 editions of the Premier League (25/08/2012).
  • Frenchman Thierry Henry, along with Alan Shearer, are the only players to have been the Premier League's top scorer three times in a row. It was during the 2003-04, 2004-05, 2005-06 and 1994-1995, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 editions, respectively.
  • In 2012, within the celebration of 20 years of the creation of the Premier League, the best were chosen in each of the following categories: 1. Best player: Thierry Henry (Arsenal), 2. Best manager: Sir Alex Ferguson (Manchester United), Best team: Arsenal 2003/04, Best season: 2011/12, Best goal: Wayne Rooney (Manchester United vs. Manchester City, February 2011), Best match: Manchester United 4-3 Manchester City ( September 2009), Best stop: Craig Gordon (Sunderland-Bolton, December 2010). Likewise, the ideal eleven was chosen by popular vote and by a "panel of experts." The eleven voted by the public were: Peter Schmeichel; Ashley Cole, Tony Adams, Nemanja Vidić, Gary Neville; Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, Steven Gerrard, Cristiano Ronaldo; Thierry Henry, Alan Shearer. The eleven of the experts was: Peter Schmeichel; Ashley Cole, Tony Adams, Rio Ferdinand, Gary Neville; Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, Steven Gerrard, Cristiano Ronaldo; Thierry Henry, Alan Shearer.
  • Frank Lampard is the first player in Premier League history to score more than ten goals in nine consecutive seasons.
  • Chilean Manuel Pellegrini is the first non-European coach to win the English League.

Historical classification

Historical Premier League standings

The 2168 points achieved by Manchester United Football Club place it as the leader in the historical classification of the competition among the 49 teams that have ever participated in it. 213 points below is the second classified, the London Arsenal Football Club, who in turn leads Chelsea Football Club by 24 points. Prepared by the Premier League is based on the points achieved by each team according to the scoring system current three points for victory.

The only six clubs that have been present in all editions of the competition are: Manchester United FC, Arsenal FC, Chelsea FC, Liverpool Football Club, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club and Everton Football Club.


Note: 3 point win scoring system. On Cursive teams without participation in the present edition.

Pos              Club Seasons PJ PG PE PP Points Securities Desc. Best Temp.
1 ° Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC 28 1076 666 236 174 2234 13 - 1st
2 ° Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC 28 1076 579 274 223 2011 3 - 1st
3 ° Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc 28 1076 578 263 235 1997 5 - 1st
4 ° County Flag of Merseyside.svg Liverpool FC 28 1076 561 265 250 1948 1 - 1st
5 ° Flag of Greater London.svg Tottenham Hotspur FC 28 1076 462 266 346 1654 - - 2st
6 ° County Flag of Merseyside.svg Everton FC 28 1076 390 306 380 1476 - - 4st
7 ° Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC 23 886 417 199 270 1450 4 2 1st
8 ° County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC 25 958 357 245 356 1316 - 2 2st
9 ° Flag of the West Midlands County.svg Aston Villa FC 25 962 324 281 358 1252 - 1 2st
10 ° Flag of Greater London.svg West Ham United FC 24 920 300 237 383 1137 - 2 5st


Statistics updated until the last game of the season 2019-20.

Historical classification Premier League and 1. Division

Note: 3 point win scoring system. On Cursive teams without participation in the present edition.

Pos              Club PJ PG PE PP G. Please G. against Def Points Securities Seasons Current Div
1 ° County Flag of Merseyside.svg Liverpool FC 4170 1966 1034 1170 6945 5031 1914 6932 19 105 Premier League
2 ° Flag of Greater London.svg Arsenal FC 4170 1899 1071 1200 6918 5235 1683 6768 13 103 Premier League
3 ° County Flag of Merseyside.svg Everton FC 4554 1849 1145 1560 7069 6308 761 6692 9 117 Premier League
4 ° Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester United FC 3814 1827 939 1048 6575 4839 1736 6420 20 95 Premier League
5 ° Flag of the West Midlands County.svg Aston Villa FC 4106 1651 975 1480 6647 6143 504 5928 7 106 Premier League
6 ° Unofficial County Flag of Greater Manchester.svg Manchester City FC 3656 1476 876 1304 5784 5252 532 5304 6 91 Premier League
7 ° Flag of Greater London.svg Tottenham Hotspur FC 3430 1425 830 1175 5416 4793 623 5105 2 85 Premier League
8 ° Flag of Greater London.svg Chelsea fc 3434 1405 882 1147 5273 4805 468 5097 6 85 Premier League
9 ° County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Newcastle United FC 3500 1348 850 1320 5241 5064 177 4894 4 88 Premier League
10 ° County Flag of Tyne Wear.svg Sunderland fc 3340 1260 780 1300 5143 5121 22 4560 6 86 League One


Statistics updated until the last game of the season 2019-20.

Historical table of top scorers

For complete details see Premier League Top Scorers and England First Division Top Scorers.

The top scorer in the competition is England's Alan Shearer with 260 goals, followed by his compatriots Wayne Rooney and Andrew Cole with 208 and 187 goals respectively, remaining the best mark in tournament history since he established it at the end of his career. sports in 2006. Argentine Sergio Agüero is the top foreign scorer, as well as being the player who managed to score the most triplets or hat tricks in the competition with twelve, one ahead of Englishman Alan Shearer. Behind them are the English Robbie Fowler, Michael Owen and the French Thierry Henry.

Agüero, Kane, Henry, Shearer and Van Persie are also the players with the best scoring average in the competition with 0.69, 0.68, 0.68, 0.59 and 0.51 goals per game respectively. Only Shearer and Rooney managed to overcome the 200-goal barrier - being the first fastest to score 100, in 124 games - while a total of 100 have managed to score more than XNUMX goals in the competition.

The statistics do not include data from seasons prior to the establishment of the Premier League in 1992. However, it should also be noted that Jimmy Greaves, Steve Bloomer and Dixie Dean are the top three scorers in the English First Division, counting all their editions, and all of them occupying prominent positions among the players with the most goals scored in the highest categories of European football, with 366, 317 and 320 goals respectively, being the English best positioned in the record. Among the active players, Wayne Rooney with 208 is the one who has scored the most goals as of 2018.

Final report: Accounted for the matches and goals according to official records. On bold font active players and current club.

Pos Player G. Go. avg Debut (Debut team) Other clubs
1 Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer 260 441 0.59 1992-93 Blackburn Rovers (112) Newcastle United (148)
2 Flag of England.svg Wayne Rooney 208 491 0.42 2002-03 Everton (25) Manchester United (183)
3 Flag of England.svg Andy cole 187 414 0.45 1993-94 Newcastle United (43)

4 Flag of Argentina.svg Sergio Agüero 181 271 0.67 2011-12 Manchester City (181)
5 Flag of England.svg Frank Lampard 177 609 0.29 1995-96 West Ham United (24) Chelsea (147) Manchester City (6)
6 Flag of France.svg Thierry Henry 175 258 0.68 1999-00 Arsenal (175)
7 Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler 163 379 0.43 1993-94 Liverpool (128) Leeds United (14), Manchester City (21), Blackburn Rovers (0)
8 Flag of England.svg Jermain Defoe 162 496 0.33 2000-01 West Ham United (18)

9 Flag of England.svg Harry Kane 159 235 0.68 2012-13 Tottenham (159)
10 Flag of England.svg Michael Owen 150 326 0.46 1996-97 Liverpool (118) Newcastle United (26) Manchester United (5), StokeCity (1)
11 Flag of England.svg The Ferdinands 149 351 0.42 1992-93 Queens Park Rangers (60)

12 Flag of England.svg Teddy sheringham 146 418 0.35 1992-93 Nottingham Forest (1)

13 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Robin van Persie 144 280 0.51 2004-05 Arsenal (96) Manchester United (48)
14 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 127 288 0.44 1997-98 Leeds United (34) Chelsea (69), Middlesbrough (22), Charlton Athletic (2)
15 Flag of Ireland.svg Robbie Keane 126 349 0.36 1999-00 Coventry City (12)

16 Flag of France.svg Nicolas Anelka 125 364 0.34 1996-97 Arsenal (23)

17 Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight yorke 123 375 0.33 1992-93 Aston Villa (60)

18 Flag of England.svg Steven Gerrard 120 504 0.24 1998-99 Liverpool (120)
19 Flag of England.svg Ian Wright 113 213 0.53 1992-93 Arsenal (104) West Ham United (9)
20 Flag of England.svg Dion dublin 111 312 0.36 1992-93 Manchester United (2) Coventry City (48), Aston Villa (48)

Statistics updated until the last game played on March 14th 2021.
Alan Shearer2008

Alan Shearer, all-time top scorer in the competition.

Historical table of maximum attendees

For a complete detail see Top assistants of the Premier League and Top assistants of the English First Division.

Final report: Accounted for the matches and goals according to official records. On bold font active players and current club.

Pos Player A. Go. avg Debut (Debut team) Other clubs
1 Flag of Wales 1959 – present.svg Ryan Giggs 162 632 0.26 1992-93 Manchester United (162)
2 Flag of Spain.svg Cesc Fàbregas 111 350 0.32 2003-04 Arsenal (70) Chelsea (41)
3 Flag of England.svg Wayne Rooney 103 491 0.21 1993-94 Everton (10) Manchester United (93)
4 Flag of England.svg Frank Lampard 102 609 0.17 1995-96 West Ham United (11) Chelsea (90) Manchester City (1)
5 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Dennis bergkamp 94 315 0.30 1995-96 Arsenal (94)
6 Flag of Spain.svg David Silva 93 309 0.30 2010-11 Manchester City (93)
7 Flag of England.svg Steven Gerrard 92 504 0.18 1998-99 Liverpool (92)
8 Flag of England.svg James milner 85 546 0.16 2001-02 Leeds United (0)

9 Flag of England.svg David Beckham 80 265 0.30 1992-93 Manchester United (80)
10 Flag of Belgium civil.svg Kevin de bruyne 78 178 0.44 2012-13 Chelsea (1) Manchester City (70)
11 Flag of England.svg Teddy sheringham 76 418 0.18 1992-93 Nottingham Forest (9)

12 Flag of France.svg Thierry Henry 74 258 0.29 1999-00 Arsenal (74)
13 Flag of Ecuador.svg Antonio Valencia 73 326 0.22 2007-08 Manchester United (62) Wigan (11)
14 Flag of England.svg Andy cole 73 414 0.18 1993-94 Newcastle United (18)

15 Flag of England.svg Ashley Young 69 369 0.19 2006-07 Watford (5) Aston Villa (39) Manchester United (35)
16 Flag of England.svg Darren anderton 68 319 0.21 1992-93 Tottenham Hotspur (67) Birmingham City (1)
17 Flag of England.svg Gareth barry 64 653 0.10 1997-98 Aston Villa (33) Manchester City (14) Everton (8) West Bromwich Albion (1)
18 Flag of England.svg Matthew le tissier 64 270 0.24 1992-93 Southampton (64)
19 Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer 64 441 0.15 1992-93 Blackburn Rovers (28) Newcastle United (36)
20 Flag of Peru.svg Nolbert Solano 62 302 0.21 1998-99 Newcastle United (54) Aston Villa (7) West Ham United (1)

Statistics updated until the last game played on March 14th 2021.
Giggs PL trophy

Ryan Giggs, the competition's top all-time assistant.

Champion coaches of the English First Division

Alex Ferguson

Sir Alex Ferguson is the most successful coach in the history of the English League, with 13 titles achieved.

  • List of coaches with at least 3 titles in the English first division.
Coach Securities Clubs Champion years
Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson
13
Manchester United 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013
Flag of Scotland.svg George Ramsay
6
Aston Villa 1894, 1896, 1897, 1899, 1900, 1910
Flag of England.svg Bob paisley
6
Liverpool 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983
Flag of England.svg Tom Watson
5
Sunderlands, Liverpool 1892, 1893, 1895, 1901, 1906
Flag of Scotland.svg Matt Busby
5
Manchester United 1952, 1956, 1957, 1965, 1967
Flag of England.svg Herbert Chapman
4
Huddersfieldtown, Arsenal 1924, 1925, 1931, 1933
Flag of Scotland.svg Frank watt
4
Newcastle United 1905, 1907, 1909, 1927
Flag of Scotland.svg Kenny dalglish
4
Liverpool, Blackburn Rovers 1986, 1988, 1990, 1995
Flag of England.svg Stan cullis
3
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1954, 1958, 1959
Flag of Scotland.svg Bill shankly
3
Liverpool 1964, 1966, 1973
Flag of France.svg Arsène Wenger
3
Arsenal 1998, 2002, 2004
Flag of Portugal.svg Jose Mourinho
3
Chelsea 2005, 2006, 2015

Sponsorship and finance

Hazard taking on Howson

Meeting between Chelsea FC and Norwich City FC in 2012.

The league has had sponsorship since 1993. It should be noted that the sponsor determines the name of the league's sponsorship. Since its inception, there have been three sponsors:

  • 1993–2001: Carling (FA Carling Premiership)
  • 2001–2004: Barclaycard (Barclaycard Premiership)
  • 2004–2007: Barclays (Barclays Premiership)
  • 2007–2016: Barclays (Barclays Premier League)
  • 2016 onwards: At least 7 main sponsors, only Nike and EA Sports revealed

As well as the league's own sponsorship, the Premier League has some official partners and suppliers.The official supplier of the ball for the league is Nike, which has had a contract with the league since the 2000-01 season, after replacing the previous one. supplier Miter.

It has the highest revenue of any football league in the world, totaling EUR 2,47 billion in the 2009-10 season, being the second most profitable after the German Bundesliga. In 2010, the The Premier League was awarded the British Queen's Awards for Enterprise in the 'International Trade' category by Queen Elizabeth II. Broadly speaking, it was recognized for its remarkable contribution to international trade and the value it brings to English football and the UK broadcasting industry. The Premier League's gross revenue often ranks fourth among the highest of any country. sports league worldwide, below the annual figures of the three most popular American sports leagues (the National Football League, Major League Baseball, and the National Basketball Association), but always above the National Hockey League.

In terms of international football, Premier League clubs are some of the richest in the world. Deloitte, which publishes club finances each year through its Football Money League listing, has listed seven Premier League clubs in the top 20 for the 2009-10 season, by comparison, no other league has had more than four clubs on that list. Premier League teams have dominated the list for several years, and even held the top spots for nearly a decade until the 2004-05 season. Following the new Premier League television deal, their revenues are expected to increase and clubs' positions on the roster to improve.

Television coverage

2009-3-14 ManUtd vs LFC Ronaldo Freekick Back

Meeting between Liverpool FC and Manchester United FC in 2009.

Television has played an important role in the history of the Premier League. The money made from television rights has in turn been vital in helping to maintain a certain level of competition both on and off the field. The league's decision to assign broadcasting rights to British Sky Broadcasting in 1992 was a radical choice at the time, but it paid off in the end. At the time, television charges were a concept that had been little examined in the British market, as was charging fans for watching live football on television. However, it was through the combination of a series of Sky strategic plans, together with the quality of Premier League football and the monitoring of the public for each game played that this concept gained considerable importance.

The Premier League sells its television rights on a collective basis. This, in contrast to other European leagues (including the Spanish one, where each club sells its rights individually), has led to a much higher share of total revenue going to the few clubs located in the world. topThe money is divided into three parts: half is distributed equally among the clubs; a quarter is awarded on a merit system based on the annual final position in the league, where the first-place club gets twenty times this amount as the last club in the league. standingwhile the other clubs get a fair amount. Finally, the last quarter is paid in the form of fees for game facilities that are broadcast on television, where the clubs in the first positions generally obtain the highest charges. Meanwhile, the total income from television rights to foreign countries is divided evenly among the twenty clubs.

See also

  • Flag shirt of Europe.svg Portal: Soccer in Europe. Content related to Soccer in Europe.
  • Flag shirt of the United Kingdom Portal: Sport in the UK. Content related to Sport in the UK.
  • Annex: Champions of English football
  • English football clubs winners of international competitions
  • Annex: Historical classification of the Premier League
  • Football League First Division
  • Football League Championship
  • England Cup
  • England League Cup
  • Community Shield (England Super Cup)
  • Youth FA Cup
  • Premier League Coach of the Year
  • Addendum: England football stadiums
  • World ranking of national leagues according to IFFHS
  • England football league system
  • England First Division

Outlinks

  • Commons-logo.svg Wikimedia Commons hosts a multimedia category on Premier League.
  • Oficial web page
  • FA Premier League on UEFA.com
  • England - First Level All-Time Tables
  • English Football League Archive
  • 6 Welsh teams playing in the English league
  • English football - News, standings, matches