Bundesliga (Germany)

Bundesliga (Germany)

Bundesliga
Fußball-Bundesliga
Soccerball current event.svg LVIII Edition (2020-21)
Bundesliga logo.svg
General data
Venue Flag of Germany.svg Germany
Opening August 24st, 1963
No. of editions (1963-Act.) - 57
Organized by Deutsche Fußball Liga (DFL)
Sponsored by
Official TV
History
Champion Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern (29)
runner-up Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
Third Flag of Saxony.svg RB Leipzig
Statistical data
Participants 18 equipment
Most laureate Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern (29)
More presences Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen (56)
Descent to Zweite Bundesliga
Classification a UEFA 2013 Champions League
Logo uefa europe 2012 Europa League
UEFA Europa Conference League logo.svg Europe Conference League
Chronology
DFB-Oberliga (1948-63)
DDR-Oberliga (1949-91)
Bundesliga
(1963-Act.)
Official site

La Bundesliga (in German:Fußball-Bundesliga Loudspeaker.svg (hear) -Federal Football League-) is the competition between top-flight football teams in Germany. It began to be played in 1963, from the unification of the old local championships called Oberligen. Next to the Zweite Bundesliga y Dritte Bundesliga, form the three national divisions of professional football in Germany.

The seasons are played from August to May, qualifying all Bundesliga teams to the DFB Cup. The winner of the competition qualifies to contest the DFL-Supercup in front of the champion of the Cup.

Throughout its history, twelve clubs have been Bundesliga champions, the most successful with 29 titles being FC Bayern, followed by BV Borussia Dortmund (5), Borussia Mönchengladbach (5), SV Werder Bremen (4), Hamburg SV (3), VfB Stuttgart (3), FC Cologne (2), FC Kaiserslautern (2) and TSV Munich, VfL Wolfsburg, Eintracht Brunswick and FC Nürnberg with only one title.

The Bundesliga is considered one of the five major European leagues along with the English Premier League, the Spanish First Division, the Italian Serie A and the Ligue 1 France, occupying fourth place in the UEFA coefficient, and according to the International Federation of Football History and Statistics (IFFHS), it is the tenth most relevant league in the world.

In the Bundesliga there is, unlike other European leagues, a definite classic, although there are matches that could be classified as such. One of them is the one that faces Bayern Munich against Werder Bremen, but the one of most importance and expected by the Germans is the one that faces Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund. Another of the most relevant duels is the one between the two most important teams in the Ruhr area, the one between Schalke and Borussia Dortmund; This rivalry has geographical reasons and is called reviewerbyAnother classic is the so-called classic of the south and the north: Bayern Munich against Hamburg, all of these games feature the most successful and popular teams in Germany.

Our Story

German Championship (1903-33)

Victoria Schalke-Museum

Replica of the original primitive trophy «Viktoria-Pokal» '.

Soccer expanded rapidly in Germany at the turn of the century XIX. The first attempt to organize some kind of national championship came in 1894, when Viktoria 89 Berlin, champion of his city, invited FC Hanau 93 to play an exhibition match. The Hanauers could not afford the costs of the trip, so they did not accept the invitation. In 2007, the 1894 final was repeated and Viktoria was crowned official champion of 1894.

After its creation in 1900, the German Football Federation (DFB) began to establish its authority over multitude of city tournaments and regional leagues that emerged throughout the country and organized the first officially recognized national championship in 1903, played under a knockout system.

The German soccer award was the Viktoria pokal, a statue of the Roman goddess of victory, donated by the committee that organized Germany's participation in the 1900 Paris Olympics and originally intended to be shared with teams playing rugby. The formation of the DFB helped to establish for the first time a clear division between the football association and the rugby union.

To qualify for the final of the German championship, the club had to win one of the regional championships, which, in some cases, predate the national one. Starting in 1925, the finalists of the competitions also qualified for the final phase of the German championship, which had been expanded to sixteen clubs. To the two strongest regions, Public chat y West, they were also allowed to send the third placed. This system of regional championships was abolished in 1933 by the Nazis and replaced by the Gauliga system.

Professionalism and the first failed proposals on the Reichsliga

Football in Germany in the 1920s and 1930s was strictly amateurish and the German Football Association, the DFB, strove to keep it that way. The establishment of a premier league, the Reichsliga (Imperial League), was considered to go hand in hand with the legalization of professionalism, as the clubs saw these two steps as a common goal. However, the DFB remained fiercely anti-professional. The DFB banned matches between German clubs and Austrian professional clubs, banned players found to accept any form of payment, and even banned entire teams, such as FC Schalke 04. Félix Linnemann, president of the DFB at that time At the time, he wanted the introduction of the Reichsliga, but failed to get approval from the regional associations in 1932.

Clubs in West Germany, especially the industrialized Ruhr region, were the most vocal in defending professionalism and the Reichsliga. To general surprise, the DFB annual convention on October 16, 1932 in Wiesbaden passed a resolution to allow professionalism, without the subject having been on the list of topics for debate and after years of opposition. It was decided to develop a framework in which professional soccer could be organized and a clear separation between professional and amateur soccer in the country could be achieved.

German Championship during the Third Reich - Gauliga (1933-48)

HR Gauligen began in 1933 to replace the Bezirkligen of the Weimar Republic. At first, the Nazis introduced 16 Gauligen regional, some subdivided into groups The introduction of the tournament was part of the transition process, where the Nazis changed the domestic administration. The leagues were created by all the new gaue, designated to replace the old German states, such as Prussia and Bavaria, and thus have a better control over the country.

Later, this step would become a disappointment among several personalities, such as the German team coaches Otto Nerz and Sepp Herberger, who had hopes of a Reichsliga, a great unified competition for all of Germany, in the same way that they were held in other countries like Italy (Serie A) and England (First Division). Shortly before the Nazis came to power, the DFB began to seriously consider creating a national league. In a special session on May 28 and 29, 1933, the decision was made to found the Reichsliga as a professional league. Four weeks before the day of the meeting arrived, the session was suspended, the federation and the Nazi ideology caused that no one agreed with the others.After the disappointment of the German team in the 1938 World Cup, the debate on the Reichsliga was reopened. In August 1939, a rally was organized to organize a modality of six Gauligas as a transition to the Reichsliga, but the beginning of World War II suspended the debate. It was not until 1963 that it was decided to take the step, when the BundesligaFor a similar reason, the German team's performance at the 1962 World Cup was disappointing, eventually they did, however they had to drastically reduce the number of teams, from 600 to 170.

NS administrative Gliederung 1944

Administrative division of Germany in 1943.

From the beginning of 1935, with the entry of Saar within the German borders, the country and the leagues began to expand. With the aggressive policies of expansion, and later, until the Second World War, the Teutonic territory increased considerably in size. New or other occupied territories were incorporated into the Third Reich. New Gauligas were founded in those regions.

After the beginning of the war, soccer continued, but the competitions were reduced because the majority of players were called to the Wehrmacht. Many Gauligas joined in subgroups to reduce travel expenses, since it became increasingly difficult to travel as the contest progressed.

Many clubs had to merge or form wartime associations due to lack of players. The competition began to decline as did the list of players for each team, since they had to depend on where [the player] was.

The last season, 1944-45, was never finished, and the competitions were canceled as each region fell under the control of the Allies until finally the capitulation of the German army took place on May 8, 1945. The last game official [before suspension] should have been disputed on April 23.

German Championship in Occupied Germany (1946-48)

After the victory in World War II of the Allies, Germany was occupied by the Soviet Union, the United States, the United Kingdom and France. All clubs were dissolved by Directive 23 of the Allied Control Council, during the denazification process, and reconstituted shortly thereafter. In each zone of occupation and in the city of Berlin (divided into four zones occupied by the four powers) a championship was established, although only in 1948 a final phase was played at the national level.

US occupation zone

In the US occupation zone, soccer resumed in November 1945, with what would later become known as Fußball-Oberliga Süd, being the first competition to be played after the war. It was configured with a league format, with a first category of 16 teams in 1945 and 20 in 1946. In 1950, after a new restructuring, a second division called Zweite Oberliga Süd.

French occupation zone

In the French occupation zone, football also resumed in 1945, with the Fußball-Oberliga Südwest. At first the championship was divided into a northern group comprising the Saarland – Palatinate – Hessian clubs, and the south, in turn subdivided into southeast and southwest. The champions of each subgroup faced each other and the southern absolute champion, the champion of the northern group. In 1946 it was simplified leaving only two groups: north and south.

British occupation zone

In the British occupation zone football was resumed in 1945 with a series of regional championships. In the 1946-47 season a final round was played for the first time in which the champions of each regional league faced each other. From 1947 the championship was reorganized into the Fußball-Oberliga Nord y Fußball-Oberliga West.

Soviet occupation zone

In the Soviet occupation zone a championship was established in 1948 under the name of Fußball-Ostzonenmeisterschaft with a knockout format. After two editions the championship was reorganized as Fußball-Oberliga der DDR in the newly established German Democratic Republic.

Busy berlin

After the end of World War II the city of Berlin was divided, as was the country with the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic. The so-called West Berlin was divided into four sectors (American, Soviet, French and British), while all the Berlin clubs were dissolved and reconstituted as Sportgemeinschaften redistributing the players of each sector among the new clubs. Clubs in East Berlin continued to play in the new Stadtliga Berlin until the 1949-50 season, when growing tensions between the powers led to the abandonment of the eastern clubs.

German Championship of the FRG - Oberliga (1946-63)

The year 1945 brought a reboot in German soccer. New leagues (under the name Oberliga) were gradually formed in Allied-occupied Germany: first in the south and then in Berlin, later in the west and north, which had suffered further damage to their infrastructure through bombing. strategic during the war. In the US occupation zone the South Oberliga was established, in the French zone the Southwest Oberliga, and in the British zone the North and West Oberligas. The Berlin Oberliga, for a time, covered the four occupation zones of the city, but the eastern clubs later left the competition. In the Soviet zone, a separate league was formed, base to become the DDR-Oberliga.

Along with the change, there would also be benefits to the players: they would be paid a salary of 120 marks a month, increasing to 400 later. Even players could receive more money through hidden accounts.

The triumph of the West German team at the 1954 World Cup in Switzerland led coach Sepp Herberger to call for the creation of a national league. Herberger had found support for his plans in Hermann Neuberger, then a DFB official, and Franz Kremer, president of FC Cologne. However, the efforts were unsuccessful.

The approval of the new championship

The failure of the national team in the 1962 World Cup in Chile was the trigger for the creation of a national league. At a convention held in Westfalenhalle, Dortmund, on July 28, 1962, the creation of the Bundesliga was officially approved with 103 votes in favor and 26 against. In parallel, new guidelines on professionalism would also be approved, raising the allowable monthly income to DM 1200, including bonuses. In the case of certain specially gifted players, there were exceptions that could be applied and granted to receive more money. In particular, FC Nuremberg, a club opposed to the creation of the Bundesliga, was ironically the first to apply this exception to 12 of its players.

German Championship of the GDR (1949-91)

After the Second World War, independent sports competitions emerged in the eastern and western occupation zones of Germany, replacing the Gauligen from the Nazi era.

In East Germany the highest football division of the GDR, the DS-Oberliga (Deutscher Sportausschuss Oberliga, the Higher League of the German Sports Association). From 1958 it bore the name of DDR-Oberliga and was part of the league's structure within the DFV (Deutscher Fußball Verband der DDR or German Football Association of the GDR).

In its inaugural season in 1949-50 the DDR-Oberliga consisted of 14 teams with two relegation places. Over the course of the next four seasons the number of teams in the division varied and included leagues from 17 to 19 teams with three or four relegation spots. From the 1954-55 season until the merger of the East and West German soccer associations in 1991-92, the league was made up of 14 teams with two relegation points.

Initially, the DDR-Oberliga was played in the classic European autumn-spring format, as was traditional in Germany. From 1956 to 1960, a classically Soviet spring-autumn style was installed. This required a transition round in 1955 and, although it was not officially declared champion of that season, the Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt finished in first place in the division. In 1961-62 the fall-spring season returned and an extended schedule (39 matches versus 26 matches) with each club playing against the rest a total of three times, once at home, once away, and once at a neutral place.

After German reunification, the last season of the DDR-Oberliga was played in 1990-91, under the name NOFV-Oberliga (Nordostdeutsche Fußballverband Oberliga or Premier League of the Northeast German Soccer Federation). The following year, the East German league structure was merged with the West German system in the German Football Federation (Deutscher Fußball-Bund) and the top two clubs in the NOFV-Oberliga, FC Hansa Rostock and Dinamo Dresden, have joined the first division of the Bundesliga.

During the league's period of existence, the DDR-League was the second division of the East German league system.

Development Bundesliga (1963-present)

The first edition of the nascent national league began on August 24, 1963 and ended on May 11, 1964, and had the participation of 16 teams, all from the Oberligas existing in the country. The first champion was FC Cologne, while Friedheim Konietzka - Borussia Dortmund player - was the scorer of the first league goal against Werder Bremen. SC Preußen Münster and Fußball-Club Saarbrücken became the first teams to be demoted.

In the following years (until 1969), clubs such as Werder Bremen, 1860 Munich, Eintracht Braunschweig, FC Nuremberg and Bayern Munich would win a league title each, in addition to Bayern itself such as Borussia Dortmund already achieving their first successes. international by winning the Recopa de Europa. One thing to consider is that in the 1966-67 season, the league would be expanded to 18 participants, the same quota that continues to be used to this day.

The 1970s would be marked by the success of Borussia Mönchengladbach - a club that would win five leagues (1970, 1971, 1975, 1976 and 1977) -, but would also mark the international dominance by Bayern Munich, the club that would be the first team of the country to win the European Champions Cup. The Gladbach He would also manage to win two UEFA Cups, in addition to the fact that, in parallel, the West German team would win the European Championship in 1972 and, two years later, the 1974 World Cup.

Between 1980 and 1990, Bayern dominated the league with seven titles to their name. Hamburg SV (1982 and 1983), VfB Stuttgart (1984) and Werder Bremen (1988) also managed to be champions in that decade. In addition, Hamburg won the European Cup, being the last club in Germany to be the top European champion before the format was changed.

In the 1990-91 season, with German reunification, the West German clubs would no longer be given exclusivity, and the clubs on the eastern side of the nation would be welcomed. In that season, Hertha Berlin would be the representative of the eastern sector of Germany. For the 1991-92 season, the league would be played with the unified country. Dinamo Dresden and FC Hansa Rostock would be the clubs from the former East Germany that made up the top division.

It also highlights that, after unification, international successes returned to the country. Bayern Munich would win the UEFA Cup in 1996, and the following year, Borussia Dortmund would be enshrined in the recent Champions League, being the first German club to win the cup under the new format.

Since the beginning of the 2000st century, the Bundesliga has been marked by the absolute domination of Bayern, a club that would also break several records. From 12 to the present, the Bavarian club would win 18 of the last XNUMX editions of the league championship; became the first - and only - team from Germany to achieve the triplet, and being the only club that has managed to win the national league seven times in a row.

Participants

Throughout the history of the competition, fifty-six different teams have participated. With the exception of Bayer Leverkusen, TSG 1899 Hoffenheim and VfL Wolfsburg, all clubs are limited sports companies governed under the 50 + 1 Rule, which establishes that members must own more than half of the club's shareholding, with the remainder of ownership in shareholders, while the two mentioned are the only ones that are exceptionally allowed to be sports entities whose largest ownership belongs to a single entity or estate.

The oldest playing field in Germany is the Weserstadion, dating back to 1909 and used by Sport-Verein Werder Bremen. On the other hand, the most recent construction in the top category is the Opel Arena, since 2012.

Season 2020-21

Note: indicated in parentheses the number of contested seasons of the competition.

2020-21 season teams
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen
(42)
Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC
(37)
Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern München
(56)
Flag of Saxony.svg RB Leipzig
(5)
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
(54)
Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FSV Mainz
(15)
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
(53)
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04
(53)
Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
(52)
Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg SC Freiburg
(21)
Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Augsburg
(10)
Flag of Berlin.svg FC Union Berlin
(2)
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne
(49)
Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg TSG Hoffenheim
(13)
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg DSC Arminia Bielefeld
(18)
Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
(57)
Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart
(54)
Flag of Lower Saxony.svg VfL Wolfsburg
(24)

Competition system

The season starts at the beginning of August and runs until the end of May of the following year, with a winter break of six weeks (mid-December to the end of January).

The teams in this category face each other according to a schedule established by lottery. Since 1995, the winner of each match has obtained three points (previously two were awarded), the tie granted one point and the defeat, zero points. Whoever scores the most points at the end of the season will be the league champion.

Currently, the champion has the right to play the group stage of the European Champions League, as well as the second, third and fourth qualified. The fifth team in the table progresses to the group stage of the UEFA Europa League, while the sixth is in the second qualifying round. If the Cup champion (who has the right to play the UEFA Europa League) qualifies for the Champions League, the finalist will play the UEFA Europa League, regardless of his position in the league (he will play the UEFA Europa League even if descends to the second league). In the event that the Cup champion has qualified for the UEFA Europa League through the League championship, the runner-up will not play in European competition, his place being awarded to the 7th classified. Until the 2011-12 season, the first 2 places went to the group stage of the UEFA Champions League, while the 3rd qualified for the preliminary round and the 4th played the UEFA Europa League. The Bundesliga's rise to third place in the UEFA rankings (beating out Italian Serie A) allowed the rise of German teams in the UEFA Champions League.

The last two in the standings are automatically lowered to the 2. Bundesliga (second division), interchanging with the first two classified in it. The second-to-last classified in the Bundesliga will play a promotion play-off with the third-placed in the 2. Bundesliga, in round-trip matches. The winner will have a place in the Bundesliga the following season.

League system

The diagram below shows the current league system in German soccer.

Level Liga
1 ° 1. Bundesliga
18 equipment
2 ° 2. Bundesliga
18 equipment
3 ° 3. League
20 equipment
4 ° Regionalliga Nord
18 equipment
Regionalliga Nordost
16 equipment
Regionalliga West
18 equipment
Regionalliga Südwest
18 equipment
Regionalliga Bayern
18 equipment
5 ° Oberliga
14 groups distributed by geographical location
NOFV-Oberliga - Schleswig-Holstein-Liga - Oberliga Hamburg - Bremen-Liga - Niedersachsenliga - Oberliga Westfalen - Oberliga Niederrhein - Oberliga Mittelrhein - Hessenliga - Oberliga Rheinland-Pfalz / Saar - Oberliga Baden-Württemberg - Bayernliga

History

  • Note: Names and flags of the teams according to the time.
Season Champion runner-up Third Notes
West German Bundesliga
1963-64 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg MSV Duisburg Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
First unified professional championship
1964-65 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
1965-66 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg TSV München (1) Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern
1966-67 Flag of Lower Saxony.svg Braunschweiger TSV Eintracht (1) Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg TSV München Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
1967-68 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Nürnberg (1) Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
1968-69 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Aachener TSV Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
1969-70 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC
1970-71 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC
1971-72 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
1972-73 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Düsseldorfer TSV Fortuna
1973-74 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Düsseldorfer TSV Fortuna
1974-75 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV
1975-76 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern
1976-77 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach (5) Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of Lower Saxony.svg Braunschweiger TSV Eintracht
1977-78 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne (2) Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC
1978-79 Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FC Kaiserslautern
1979-80 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FC Kaiserslautern
1980-81 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart
1981-82 Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern
1982-83 Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV (3) Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart
1983-84 Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
1984-85 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne
1985-86 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg KFC Bayer Uerdingen
1986-87 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
1987-88 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne
1988-89 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
1989-90 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
1990-91 Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FC Kaiserslautern Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
Fußball-Bundesliga
1991-92 Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
First championship after German reunification
1992-93 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
1993-94 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FC Kaiserslautern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen
1994-95 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg SC Freiburg
1995-96 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04
1996-97 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
1997-98 Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FC Kaiserslautern (2) Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer Leverkusen
1998-99 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC
1999-00 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV
2000-01 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
2001-02 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern
2002-03 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
2003-04 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen (4) Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer Leverkusen
2004-05 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
2005-06 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV
2006-07 Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart (3) Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
2007-08 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04
2008-09 Flag of Lower Saxony.svg VfL Wolfsburg (1) Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart
2009-10 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
2010-11 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern
2011-12 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia (5) Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04
2012-13 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen
2013-14 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04
2014-15 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Lower Saxony.svg VfL Wolfsburg Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
2015-16 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen
2016-17 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of Saxony.svg RB Leipzig Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
2017-18 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg TSG Hoffenheim
2018-19 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of Saxony.svg RB Leipzig
2019-20 Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern (29) Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia Flag of Saxony.svg RB Leipzig
Consecutive championship record (8)

History

Since the establishment of the Bundesliga in the 1963-64 season, a total of twelve teams have been proclaimed champions.

Club Championships Runners-up Third Years Champion
Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern
29
10
5
1969, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1980, 1981, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1994, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia
5
7
6
1995, 1996, 2002, 2011, 2012
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
5
2
6
1970, 1971, 1975, 1976, 1977
Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen
4
7
5
1965, 1988, 1993, 2004
Flag of Hamburg.svg Hamburger SV
3
5
3
1979, 1982, 1983
Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart
3
2
3
1984, 1992, 2007
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne
2
5
2
1964, 1978
Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate.svg FC Kaiserslautern
2
1
2
1991, 1998
Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg TSV 1860
1
1
-
1966
Flag of Lower Saxony.svg VfL Wolfsburg
1
1
-
2009
Flag of Lower Saxony.svg Braunschweiger TSV Eintracht
1
-
1
1967
Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Nuremberg
1
-
-
1968
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04
-
7
4
-
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen
-
5
5
-
Flag of Berlin.svg Hertha Berliner SC
-
1
4
-
Flag of Saxony.svg RB Leipzig
-
1
2
-
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg MSV Duisburg
-
1
-
-
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Aachener TSV
-
1
-
-
Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
-
-
4
-
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Düsseldorfer TSV Fortuna
-
-
2
-
Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg KFC Bayer Uerdingen
-
-
1
-
Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg SC Freiburg
-
-
1
-
Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg TSG Hoffenheim
-
-
1
-

Historical record of First Division

Considering that Germany was separated behind the Iron Curtain, in both countries, both in the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic, tournaments were held that validly awarded the title of German champion.

Karte-Deutsche-Fussballmeister

Chart showing all German champions.

Pos Team Securities First and last title Liga
1 FC Bayern Munich 30 1932-2020 First tournaments and Bundesliga
2 Berlin Dynamo 10 1979-1988 DDR-Oberliga
3 FC Nuremberg 9 1920-1968 First tournaments and Bundesliga
4 Borussia Dortmund 8 1956-2012 First tournaments and Bundesliga
Dynamo Dresden 8 1953-1990 DDR-Oberliga
5 Gelsenkirchen-Schalke 04 7 1934-1958 First tournaments
Hamburg SV 6 1923-1983 First tournaments and Bundesliga
6 ASK Vorwärts Berlin 6 1959-1969 DDR-Oberliga
9 VfB Stuttgart 5 1950-2007 First tournaments and Bundesliga
Borussia Mönchengladbach 5 1970-1977 Bundesliga
11 FC Kaiserslautern 4 1951-1998 First tournaments and Bundesliga
SV Werder Bremen 4 1965-2004 Bundesliga
13 VfB Leipzig * 3 1903-1913 First tournaments
SpVgg Fürth 3 1914-1929 First tournaments
SC Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt 3 1956-1959 DDR-Oberliga
FC Cologne 3 1962-1978 First tournaments and Bundesliga
FC Carl Zeiss Jena 3 1963-1970 DDR-Oberliga
FC Magdeburg 3 1972-1975 DDR-Oberliga
19 Berliner TuFC Viktoria 1889 2 1908-1911 First tournaments
Hertha Berliner SC 2 1930-1931 First tournaments
Hannover 96 2 1938-1954 First tournaments
Dresdner SC 2 1943-1944 First tournaments
FC Sachsen Leipzig 2 1951-1964 DDR-Oberliga
FC Rot-Weiss Erfurt 2 1954-1955 DDR-Oberliga
25 FC Union 92 Berlin 1 1905 First tournaments
Freiburger FC 1 1907 First tournaments
FC Phöenix Karlsruhe 1 1909 First tournaments
Karlsruher FV 1 1910 First tournaments
Holstein Kiel 1 1912 First tournaments
Fortuna Düsseldorf 1 1933 First tournaments
SK Rapid Vienna 1 1941 First tournaments
VfR Mannheim 1 1949 First tournaments
Horch zwickau 1 1950 DDR-Oberliga
BSG Turbine Halle 1 1952 DDR-Oberliga
Rot-Weiss Essen 1 1955 First tournaments
Eintracht Frankfurt 1 1959 First tournaments
TSV München 1 1966 Bundesliga
Eintracht Braunschweig 1 1967 Bundesliga
Chemnitzer FC 1 1967 DDR-Oberliga
Hansa Rostock 1 1991 DDR-Oberliga
VfL Wolfsburg 1 2009 Bundesliga

Note: the 1904 * and 1945 championships are not included because the first was canceled due to the disagreement of the VfB Leipzig club and the second due to the Second World War.

Statistics

Historical classification

The 3830 points achieved by FC Bayern Munich place it as the absolute leader in the Bundesliga's historical standings, above the second place occupied by Borussia Dortmund and SV Werder Bremen closes the podium. This table is based on the points scored by each team in the Bundesliga, based on the current scoring system for victories of two or three points to the winner, and establishing a historical record with the three-point one spanning from the 1963-64 season to 2020-21.

  • Note: 3 point win scoring system. On Cursive teams without participation in the present edition.
Pos       Club Seasons Points PJ PG PE PP GF GC diff Securities Current Div
1. Flag of Bavaria lozengy.svg FC Bayern 56 3830 1900 1139 413 348 4211 2068 +2143 29 Bundesliga
2. Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg BV Borussia 54 2918 1824 818 464 542 3270 2564 +706 5 Bundesliga
3. Flag of Bremen.svg SV Werder Bremen 57 2885 1926 800 485 641 3205 2816 +389 4 Bundesliga
4. Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Hamburger SV 55 2733 1866 746 495 625 2937 2662 +275 3 Bundesliga 2
5. Flag of Baden-Württemberg.svg VfB Stuttgart 54 2690 1824 749 443 632 3016 2669 +347 3 Bundesliga
6. Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach 53 2661 1798 730 471 597 3056 2601 +455 5 Bundesliga
7. Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Schalke 04 53 2526 1790 691 453 646 2598 2590 +8 - Bundesliga
8. Flag of Hesse.svg Eintracht Frankfurt 52 2383 1756 646 447 663 2759 2716 +43 - Bundesliga
9. Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg FC Cologne 49 2353 1654 644 421 589 2693 2479 +214 2 Bundesliga
10 Flag of North Rhine-Westphalia.svg Bayer 04 Leverkusen 42 2225 1424 613 386 425 2395 1903 +492 - Bundesliga


Statistics updated to season 2020-21.

Historic scorers table

The top scorer in the competition is Gerd Müller of Germany with 365 goals in 427 games, which also ranks him as the player with the best scoring average in the history of the championship, followed by his compatriots Klaus Fischer and Jupp Heynckes with 268 and 220 goals respectively.

Among the active players, the Polish Robert Lewandowski has the highest record with 267 goals in 344 games.

It is also worth mentioning the aforementioned Seeler and Müller, who are two of the players who have scored the most goals in the highest categories of European football, with 406 and 365 goals respectively, the Germans being the best positioned in the record. Among the goals scored by Seeler, 404 belong to the German top flight, including the predecessor competition of the Bundesliga.

Final report: Accounted for the matches and goals according to official records. On bold font active players and current club.

Pos Played G. Go. avg temp Clubs
1 Flag of Germany.svg Gerd Muller 365 427 0.85 1965-79 FC Bayern (365)
2 Flag of Poland.svg Robert Lewandowski 271 346 0.78 2010 BV Borussia Dortmund (74) FC Bayern (197)
3 Flag of Germany.svg Klaus fischer 268 545 0.49 1968-88 TSV 1860 (28), Schalke 04 (182) FC Cologne (31), VfL Bochum (27)
4 Flag of Germany.svg Jupp Heynckes 220 369 0.60 1965-78 Borussia Mönchengladbach (195), Hanover 96 (25)
5 Flag of Germany.svg Manfred burgsmüller 213 447 0.48 1969-90 Rot-Weiss Essen (12), BV Borussia Dortmund (135), FC Nuremberg (12), SV Werder Bremen (34)
6 Flag of Peru.svg Claudio Pizarro 197 490 0.4 1999-2020 SV Werder Bremen (109) FC Bayern (87) FC Cologne (1)
7 Flag of Germany.svg ulf kirsten 181 350 0.52 1990-03 Bayer 04 Leverkusen (182)
8 Flag of Germany.svg Stefan kuntz 179 449 0.40 1983-99 VfL Bochum (47), FC Uerdingen (32), FC Kaiserslautern (75), Arminia Bielefeld (75)
9 Flag of Germany.svg Dieter Muller 177 303 0.58 1973-86 FC Cologne (159) VfB Stuttgart (14), FC Saarbrücken (4)
= Flag of Germany.svg Klaus Allofs 177 424 0.42 1975-93 Fortune Duesseldorf (47), FC Cologne (88) SV Werder Bremen (18)
11 Flag of Germany.svg Mario Gomez Garcia 170 328 0.52 2004-2019 VfB Stuttgart (78) FC Bayern (75) VfL Wolfsburg (17)
12 Flag of Germany.svg Hannes Lohr 166 381 0.44 1964-77 FC Cologne (166)
13 Flag of Germany.svg Karl-Heinz Rummenigge 162 310 0.52 1974-84 FC Bayern (162)
14 Flag of Germany.svg Bernd Holzenbein 160 420 0.38 1967-81 Eintracht Frankfurt (160)
15 Flag of Germany.svg Fritz walter 157 348 0.45 1983-96 VfB Stuttgart (102), Waldhof Mannheim (55)

Statistics updated until March 20th 2021.
Muller 1974

Gerd Müller, all-time top scorer in the competition.

Players with the highest number of games played

Germany's Karl-Heinz Körbel is the player with the most appearances with 602 during his 19 seasons, followed by Manfred Kaltz's 581 and Oliver Kahn's 557. The players with at least 500 games played are listed below.

Note: Active players and current club in bold.

Pos Player Go. Tit. temp Most representative club
1 Flag of Germany.svg Karl-Heinz Korbel 602 (600) 1972 - 1991 (19) Eintracht Frankfurt
2 Flag of Germany.svg Manfred kaltz 581 (573) 1971 - 1991 (20) Hamburg SV
3 Flag of Germany.svg Oliver Kahn 557 (555) 1987 - 2008 (21) FC Bayern Munich
4 Flag of Germany.svg Klaus Fichtel 552 (545) 1965 - 1988 (23) Schalke 04
5 Flag of Germany.svg Mirko Votava 546 (528) 1976 - 1996 (20) SV Werder Bremen
6 Flag of Germany.svg Klaus fischer 535 (525) 1968 - 1988 (20) Schalke 04
7 Flag of Germany.svg Eike immel 534 (534) 1978 - 1995 (17) BV Borussia Dortmund
8 Flag of Germany.svg Willi neuberger 520 (513) 1966 - 1983 (17) Eintracht Frankfurt
9 Flag of Germany.svg Michael Lameck 518 (514) 1972 - 1988 (16) VfL Bochum
10 Flag of Germany.svg Uli stein 512 (512) 1978 - 1997 (19) Hamburg SV
11 Flag of Germany.svg Stefan reuter 502 (496) 1984 - 2004 (20) BV Borussia Dortmund

Statistics updated until March 8th 2020.
Koerbel

Karl-Heinz Körbel, player with the most matches in the competition.

Individual honors

Among the players with the most titles, the French Franck Ribéry, the Austrian David Alaba and the German Thomas Müller stand out with nine championships with the Fußball-Club Bayern, breaking the eight championships achieved by the former members of the Bavarian team, Oliver Kahn, Mehmet Scholl, Bastian Schweinsteiger, Philipp Lahm, Manuel Neuer, Jérôme Boateng and Robert Lewandowski (the latter won 2 titles with Borussia Dortmund and the other 6 championships with Fußball-Club Bayern).

In the individual record, by the coaches, Udo Lattek stands out, who won eight championships, followed by the seven achieved by Ottmar Hitzfeld, divided into eleven of them for FC Bayern, two for Borussia Mönchengladbach and two for Ballspielverein Borussia. Behind them are the four titles achieved by Hennes Weisweiler and Jupp Heynckes.

They complete the list of coaches who were able to repeat the title: Otto Rehhagel, Felix Magath and Pep Guardiola with three, and Max Merkel, Branko Zebec, Pál Csernai, Ernst Happel and Jürgen Klopp with two.

It is worth highlighting the aforementioned Lattek and Heynckes as the two coaches with the most wins with 184 and 161 respectively. With 158 is the also mentioned Hitzfeld.

Bundesliga broadcasting rights

SC Freiburg vs FSVMainz 17 August 2013 60

The Bundesliga is broadcast on television in more than 200 countries.

The Bundesliga rights for television, radio, internet and mobile phones are distributed by DFL Sports Enterprises, a subsidiary of the Deutsche Fußball Liga. The Bundesliga broadcasting rights are sold together with the broadcasting rights for the relegation play-offs, 2. Bundesliga and German Super Cup The Bundesliga is broadcast on television in more than 200 countries.
At the local level, Sky has all the rights to broadcast all the first and second league matches on a pay TV basis. Deutsche Telekom owns the rights to IPTV. Only four games - the season opener, the first game after the winter break and the two relegation play-off games - are broadcast on free TV on ARD. Since August 2008, 90elf has the rights to broadcast all first and second league matches online and via digital audio streaming.

Since 2020, the television rights of the Bundesliga belong to Claro Sports (All Latin America), Tigo Sports (only for Bolivia), Fox Sports Mexico (only Mexico), Azteca Deportes (only for Mexico), Sky Sports (Mexico), (Only for Mexico, Central America and the Dominican Republic) and Onefootball for all of Latin America and Brazil. Also in Brazil, there is Rede Bandeirantes, which broadcasts 1 game per date..

As of October 17, one game per day will be broadcast on Costa Rican open television through Teletica channel 7.
Servisky (El Canal del Fútbol) broadcasts the Bundesliga for Ecuador.
In England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Ireland, the Bundesliga is broadcast on BT Sport.

Eurosport 2 has the rights to broadcast in Serbia. In Greece, most Bundesliga matches are broadcast on OTE's cable television platform, Conn-x TV Sports. Sport TV broadcasts one live match per week for Portugal. In Spain, the Bundesliga is broadcast on Digital +. In Italy, the Bundesliga is broadcast on Fox Sports (Italy).

In India, a maximum of three matches a week are broadcast on NEO Sports, generally two live and one already completed.

In Japan, the Bundesliga is broadcast on Fuji TV, NHK and FOX.

In China, CCTV-5 and STAR Sports have exclusive matches every week. In 2015, FOX will have the English language rights for the Bundesliga in China.

In Hong Kong, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Afghanistan; the Bundesliga is broadcast on FOX Sports.

In Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Syria, Tunisia and Yemen; by BeIN Sports, which bought the full broadcasting rights to Dubai Sports.

See also

  • Flag shirt of Europe.svg Portal: Soccer in Europe. .
  • German cup
  • German Super Cup
  • German League Cup
  • Annex: Record of the German Soccer Championship
  • DDR-Oberliga of the German Democratic Republic
  • Football Cup of the German Democratic Republic
  • Top scorers in the Bundesliga
  • Annex: Football clubs in Germany
  • Annex: Football stadiums in Germany
  • German Footballer of the Year
  • Coach of the year in Germany
  • World ranking of national leagues according to IFFHS
  • Women's Bundesliga
  • Germany Women's Soccer Cup

Outlinks

  • Commons-logo.svg Wikimedia Commons hosts a multimedia category on Bundesliga.
  • Oficial web page
  • Bundesliga on UEFA.com
  • 1. Bundesliga channel on YouTube.